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I think this is very impressive. The video is quick but good.

 

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I remember when "thin was in". Once had a super thin 1960's Seiko Goldfeather that was really thin. Sometimes wish I had kept it.

Great article Mike.
 

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"Thin" showed a great watchmaking firm, anyone could make lumpen movements.

Nowadays with big chunky cases being in fashion the quest for slimness seems to have gone out of the window although of course it is far easier to make a slim manual wind movements than an auto.

My thinnest watch is this Hamilton Intra-Matic auto with micro rotor movement to keep it slim.



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Very cool. I have my fathers vintage Eternamatic 1000. Eterna was known for making thin movements at one time.
 

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I just did a search for it and it remains vaporware. Not being offered for sale anywhere I could find. I don't doubt they've built a few, but it's much more publicity than practicality. You can't go down to your local B&M high end jewelry store and buy one. At best it would be special ordered, and if you need to ask the price, you can't afford it. I suspect it's at least $30,000. My thinnest is a 6mm Aristo, powered by a Peseux (ETA) 7001, which was considered the thinnest "production" mechanical movement until ETA quit making them. Everything else had been custom built, or very limited production for a few pieces. It is about as thin as mere mortals will see and own. Aristo made a series of them in 2003. They came and went fairly quickly. I was lucky to snag this one a couple years later.

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John
 
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