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I was thinking, when a car that retails for $5000. is crashed and the cost to fix is more than that, the car is "Totalled."

I have more than a few old Seikos that if fixed would be worth $50-$100, but will cost $100 or more to fix with full tear down and service.

I guess these are "Totals." What do you guys think ?
 

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Depends on the watch i suppose but they can also relive by being donors for other watches, it is all about spares :)
 

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Seiko watches are analogous to Land Rovers (up to the Defender). They just seem to live on, whether it's the original or parts used for transplants. The main difference is Land Rover's propensity to self degrade to their original oxide form.
 

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It seems as most of these watches aren't really worth being serviced since it doesn't seem to add much if anything to the value. That's why it's a hobby.
 

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It seems as most of these watches aren't really worth being serviced since it doesn't seem to add much if anything to the value. That's why it's a hobby.
Or..............you learn to do it yourself ?
 

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It seems as most of these watches aren't really worth being serviced since it doesn't seem to add much if anything to the value. That's why it's a hobby.
That's the joy of these Seiko's as far as I am concerned. They are lookers, they are reliable if looked after and most importantly they are cheap to buy :cool:

I have a friend who owns about 4 Rolex originals not cheap copies. They are forever going back to Rolex to be fixed. Each one must owe him £5,000GBP. None look as nice as my Seiko's which I keep pointing out to him :D
 

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Like Ancient things

Remember they dig up a lot of Treasure all over the place,
especially Gem's, Gold, and also enter Tombs and Caves
that were used to hide things or just for special uses.
But when what is put into theses places, when found
many years or centuries later they are very Precious yet
and still have a value to them.
When they are all found and all cleaned up and then
the real beauty is shown and it makes it precious and
valuable again, some time more in both.

But some one had to do all this to bring them back to what
they were originally.

No one liked them in their found state, but you get some
one to do all that work, then many will change their thoughts
about what they first saw and then cherish it more in value
and appearances. Then the value will increase and possession
of it will become a must to have it.
________________________________________________
Note:
But ....." Only until some one did some thing about it ", then
many will start to want it, value it, and try to get it.

But no one wanted the task of going thorough all what it took to
do it.

Effort has a lot of ....." Power ", to it, but " Some One ", has to have it.

The holder has the final power, had the Effort, and the final result
to show for it, and has the final out come of it.
 

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well i think the journey is just as important as the find..the best feeling is making something new again...and just because the value is not huge for some does not mean we should not save every piece...i guess i just see value in everything no matter how small it may be..
 

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I'm still working my way up to that, but the cost of the tools to do so is not insignificant either.
You can do very well on cheap tools. It really is not important to have the highest quality tools when you start out. Knowing what to do with them is FAR more important - and that just takes practice. I brought a lot of about 30 watch movements (mostly swiss) and set about seeing how many I could make tick.....probably cost me £40 for the tools and the movements all in all.
IMO
 

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4 choices as i see it,
1/ Dont do any thing, and have a fine collection of watches that don't work

2/ Buy some screwdrivers, a big hammer and have a go yourself.

3/ Pay out and get someone to do the work, depending on what you have it could be an investment.

4/ Sell them, and put the money towards a new watch.
 

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You can do very well on cheap tools. It really is not important to have the highest quality tools when you start out. Knowing what to do with them is FAR more important - and that just takes practice. I brought a lot of about 30 watch movements (mostly swiss) and set about seeing how many I could make tick.....probably cost me £40 for the tools and the movements all in all.
IMO
Polly did the same with a lot of super clapped movements from Ramon and the nastiest tools from Cousins.

I would say that many watches have some value as spares and sometimes are worth more broken up for the parts, 6105's etc.
 

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But...........................you really can not beat having a few quality tools that you use all the while, you don't need loads, but just the ones you use regular like tweezers (quality a must imo) etc, needent spend a lot but imo what you do spend, spend wisely :)

How do I know ? easy i bought some crap tools and they were crap and priced accordingly, you get what you pay for.
 

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Just think of your old Seiko as a classic car. Most classic cars cost far more than their market value to restore, and when they're gone, they're gone, so it's not always as simple as how much is it worth versus how much did it cost.
 

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There is money to be made out there to anyone of you guys with these skills. There are a lot of people who will never be able to do these repairs and services. It takes a certain touch and mind frame. Thickman808 is always under estimating he's skills to me. Ok I have now serviced a 6139 from start to finish and it's keeping spot on time but I also nearly killed another two in the process. Probably should have started on some thing less complicated! Practice is the key but so is being able to keep your cool when things go tits up. Ok starting this while giving up smoking probably wasn't my brightest move either! but still I take my hat off to you lot as I know professionals that do not do half the job you do on your watches. I'd agree with Mr Tiger dude too tweasers being quality goes a long way as does decent screw driver tips! I'd recommend buying old swiss tools off fleabuy.
 

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The views from jringo8769 and advice from The Tiger UK are right on the money...Especially about the tweezers...I'm going to finally get a couple of quality tweezers after making do with economical ones for the start of my repair endeavors .
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
OP here, checking back in. I agree that if you can do the repairs yourself, you can make economic sense out of bringing an old broken Seiko back to life. I can do the easy stuff like change stems and hands and dials, but not yet ready to fix the internals. So for me, a watch that stops is often just another broken watch in my collection. Hence, "totalled".

If it were sentimentally important, that's a different thing too.
 
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