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Ok we see a "bargain" and snap it up, perhaps a $200 watch for a quarter of the price, bargain!!!

We receive it and then we see why it was a bargain.

Lets say the bargain was a 6139-6XXX for example and after inspection it needs:

A new stem=$20 if your lucky.
A complete stem with spring and gear=$60
A new crown=$10
A couple of new pushers and we are fortunate that such has Stefan has stock=$27
A few spare links for a hard to find bracelet, if you can get them as the original bracelets are often harder to get than the watch (imo)=$20
Full set of gaskets=$20
NOS crystal $25

Prices all approximate, might be cheaper or more expensive but a rough total of $160 ? and thats if they are available ?

Then the time, effort etc required to get it all together, the bargain isent now looking quite the bargain it was :)

Perhaps would have been better to buy a decent one in the first place ?

IMO a lot of these bargains are great if you already have spares or you are buying the bargain to harvest, but if you are just buying the bargain because you think its a "bargain", think again :) fun isent it :)
 

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That's why it's always best to buy the best you can afford... It'll cost less in the long run.
 

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That's why it's always best to buy the best you can afford... It'll cost less in the long run.

This imo is so true.

“It is unwise to pay too much, but it is worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money—that is all. When you pay too little you sometimes lose everything because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do ... If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.”
— John Ruskin (1819-1900)
 

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I've had a couple like that, but many more that were real bargains. I get the satisfaction in restoring something that had been written off, so what if the finished article is no longer 'a bargain', it still feels great to have resurrected it.:cool:
 

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It's always been wise to buy the best you can afford. Take the classic car market for instance when a few years ago when I had an interest in it a properly restored 'e' type would cost say £30k (depending on MK etc) but if you bought a rough runner for £10K you could spend £30K restoring it.

From my experience with old Seiko's true bargains are few and far between, weather you are buying a good one or to restore you just have to pay for what you want at the end of the day.

Almost all of my vintage Chrono collection is made up of crap I have had to refurbish and if I were to wait for a lot of them to turn up mint to buy it would be a very long wait, so there is an argument for buying a 'bargain' and spending as much again doing it up.
 

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This is why the "I" in WIS stands for Idiot..........:dizzy:

This is an expensive hobby but there is satisfaction in the restoration and as time goes on the bits and bob's come in handy.
 

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Unfortunately more often than not! Last year I picked up a vintage Zodiac Seawolf in a lot box for the hefty sum of $5.00. Even though there were about 15 watches in the lot, the Seawolf was my target. Turned out it was a real dog. I realized it would have costed me more than the watch was actually worth to make it nice. Luckily I was able to swap it to my local guy. He sold it for parts. The hunt continues!

Cheers!
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've had a couple like that, but many more that were real bargains. I get the satisfaction in restoring something that had been written off, so what if the finished article is no longer 'a bargain', it still feels great to have resurrected it.:cool:
And...........that is one of the main things i like about this hobby :)

Not much in life is totally free :)
 

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well i can contest i have spent more than i could have bought a nice finished for i am sure but the pleasure of saving a watch from certain death or becoming parts is very satisfying and most of what i treasure in my collection is the ones i have saved..dont get me wrong..i love a completely untouched watch...but to me the ability to bring together all the missing pieces and take something that was so unloved and abandoned to something that is the showpiece is very rewarding...i guess a lot is personal to the person...if i could not do any of the work...i would have to be more choosy i guess..thank God i can still see and do some of the work myself...God Bless John...and what else helps too is lot and lots of patience...
 

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Worse still is when you get yourself a 'bargain', spend more than its worth fixing it up and then never bond with the watch. You're reluctant to let it go because you can't make anything like your money back :-(

I ran into this with a 6139 6012 a year ago. Had to buy a parts watch and spent more on service than any other watch to date (I guess because my watch guy had to strip and clean two movements). The end links weren't quite right and the crystal wasn't as good as I'd like. There were always other watches I'd rather wear and I felt obligated to wear it occasionally. Still, this one has a happy ending. I decided to give it one last go and got a new crystal and replaced the bracelet with a nice black leather one and now I'm loving it.
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1424042847.698967.jpg


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well hey we all can say at least we learned from it and maybe got some valuable experience from it too
 
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