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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

Sorry for yet another newbie question ;)

For those using an Ultrasonic Cleaner for the watch parts cleaning what fluid do you use as the main cleaning agent.

Thanks for any input and help with this

Paul
 

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I use Zap - which I buy from a supplier here. It's like white spirits which was the traditional fluid watchmakers used. Don't buy L & R stuff - it's not as good as claimed and leaves a reside which then is often hard to clean off properly with fluids like white spirits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
NZWatchDoctor do you have a link to the Zap product, I googled it but only came up with a grout cleaner, is that the stuff you are using ?
 

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L&R fluids were a revelation for me the first time I used them. I've a brass cleaning basket that came out looking like it was gold plated and the watch parts had a shine that I'd never achieved using lighter fluid or essence of renata etc.

Now thanks to changes in shipping rules last year I'm having difficulty in sourcing it as all the suppliers are in GB and can't ship it across the water to N Ireland due to the hazardous nature. I've just had a quote for £125 for shipping from one supplier in England so I'll pay it because it's worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
£125 ouch

would it not be cheaper to jump on the ferry and pop over and pick it up yourself, provided there was a dealer close enough to the docks to make it worthwhile.
 

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That thought or similar crossed my mind but sometimes it is easier just biting the bullet and paying.

£125 ouch

would it not be cheaper to jump on the ferry and pop over and pick it up yourself, provided there was a dealer close enough to the docks to make it worthwhile.
 

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Craftsman
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I use L+R washing and rinsing solutions and have had no issues in my Bulova Watchmaster ultrasonic cleaner and my Vibrograf RM90. The parts always come out clean + bright.

If anyone is having an issue with L+R solutions it would be my bet they don't change the fluid often enough when it gets dirty .
 

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Craftsman
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I purchased a Bulova Ultrasonic Watchmaster cleaning machine from Tom and started using the LR cleaning and rinse fluids for Ultrasonic machines. I must say the parts are noticeably brighter and cleaner than with my old method and it may just be coincidence that my watch services are yielding better performance results overall. This could be attributed to my skills growing with experience but I did notice I was getting higher amplitudes after I started using the new Watchmaster and L&R cleaning fluids. Definitely worth the investment in my opinion.
 

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Please know that nzwatchdoctor’s opinion is not held by the majority of professional watchmakers, nor by the companies who make watches.

Please know that the "majority of professional watchmakers" I know here don't use it or use very limited amounts of it and that rileynp has provided no proof to back up his claims.
 

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Please know that nzwatchdoctor’s opinion is not held by the majority of professional watchmakers, nor by the companies who make watches.
Is this your opinion - most would call it trolling
 

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Paul,
If I have not properly acquitted myself in regards to my knowledge and experience over the years on the forum, then I don’t think trying to start now will convince you. I will say that I’ve been fortunate in my career so far to have received extra training (and continued testing) from a few watch brands regarding the after-sales servicing of their products, and there is no question that they would not even consider allowing the use of products not carefully designed for safely cleaning watch parts. I also know other watchmakers who have received training from brands I have not, and their use of industry-improved solutions is also a given.
If you choose to scoff at this particular industry standard that I’ve put forth, it speaks to what your expectations for excellence are, and suggests you don’t care about the long-term impact you are having on the watches that go through your hands. That’s fine, but I don’t like you coming here and tainting the water for those who don’t know how out of touch you are. The goal here is not to find the lowest common denominator in the cheapest and easiest method possible. Rather, it is to give wise advice to those who seek it, and set a good example that ultimately aims to preserve the one resource we all collectively care deeply about- our watches.
While we understandably don’t know what we don’t know, we are even more foolish when we refuse to listen to those who have invested countless man hours and money into elevating their service standards. In this case, the watch companies are at a distinct advantage to speak from authority, and a continued dismissal of this earned authority suggests an unnecessarily large ego- do you think you know better than everyone else, including watch companies with eye-watering R&D budgets?
I’ve patiently endured your presence here, and will continue to do so as long as you follow the rules. But do know that I will face you head on whenever I think you are giving poor advice.
 

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Paul,
If I have not properly acquitted myself in regards to my knowledge and experience over the years on the forum, then I don’t think trying to start now will convince you. I will say that I’ve been fortunate in my career so far to have received extra training (and continued testing) from a few watch brands regarding the after-sales servicing of their products, and there is no question that they would not even consider allowing the use of products not carefully designed for safely cleaning watch parts. I also know other watchmakers who have received training from brands I have not, and their use of industry-improved solutions is also a given.
If you choose to scoff at this particular industry standard that I’ve put forth, it speaks to what your expectations for excellence are, and suggests you don’t care about the long-term impact you are having on the watches that go through your hands. That’s fine, but I don’t like you coming here and tainting the water for those who don’t know how out of touch you are. The goal here is not to find the lowest common denominator in the cheapest and easiest method possible. Rather, it is to give wise advice to those who seek it, and set a good example that ultimately aims to preserve the one resource we all collectively care deeply about- our watches.
While we understandably don’t know what we don’t know, we are even more foolish when we refuse to listen to those who have invested countless man hours and money into elevating their service standards. In this case, the watch companies are at a distinct advantage to speak from authority, and a continued dismissal of this earned authority suggests an unnecessarily large ego- do you think you know better than everyone else, including watch companies with eye-watering R&D budgets?
I’ve patiently endured your presence here, and will continue to do so as long as you follow the rules. But do know that I will face you head on whenever I think you are giving poor advice.
I think we’ve all seen Paul’s at best questionable advice throughout the years. I think Noah was calling a spade a spade, definitely not trolling. That’s my opinion.


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Then he should be calling out all the rest who happly recommend dish wash detergent, vinegar, or lighter fluid etc, if you look at the specs of chemical Paul uses and L & R they are based on the same main active ingredient - Naphtha , its used in most metal cleaners. Their is a major difference in fixing one watch a month as a hobby and doing a number of watches a day as a job, If Noah is going to start a rant on "questionable advice" on this forum them he's going to have to be fair and do it to all, ( he will be busy )
Its a pity the large watch companies with eye watering R&D budgets keep great secrets, and will do nothing for this forum
Noah has made it personal, as a "super Moderator" he has other options, he made it personal thats trolling
 

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For bracelet cleaning isn't HOT water with washing up liquid good?
It's ideal but often something harsher is needed - well for the watches I deal with anyway.
Dare I mention that I sometimes let extremely grubby stainless (uncoated) bracelets soak overnight in neat Flash liquid ? :p
474529

(before rinsing thoroughly under the tap). As their old slogan goes - Flash Works Wonders. :)
 

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Craftsman
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Then he should be calling out all the rest who happly recommend dish wash detergent, vinegar, or lighter fluid etc, if you look at the specs of chemical Paul uses and L & R they are based on the same main active ingredient - Naphtha , its used in most metal cleaners. Their is a major difference in fixing one watch a month as a hobby and doing a number of watches a day as a job, If Noah is going to start a rant on "questionable advice" on this forum them he's going to have to be fair and do it to all, ( he will be busy )
Its a pity the large watch companies with eye watering R&D budgets keep great secrets, and will do nothing for this forum
Noah has made it personal, as a "super Moderator" he has other options, he made it personal thats trolling
Maybe you're not aware that Noah is a Professional Watchmaker who is always happy to share Good Advise with us all.
 
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