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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My automatic Emporio Armani watch is running way too fast. I haven't worn it since I got my hand wind ,Stuhrling watch, one or two weeks ago and out of curiosity I checked it and it is already 5 minutes ahead. I think that I am going to send the watch in to get it fixed while it is still under warranty.
 

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Call it 10 days and you're running fast by 30 seconds per day. That's not great but actually not so far out of listed specs for many lower end autos. I know Tissot says -10 to +20. I bet it's sitting in one position that it runs faster in. If you start wearing it again it will return to normal.


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Call it 10 days and you're running fast by 30 seconds per day. That's not great but actually not so far out of listed specs for many lower end autos. I know Tissot says -10 to +20. I bet it's sitting in one position that it runs faster in. If you start wearing it again it will return to normal.


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It's not really sitting in one position because it is in a watch winder. When I was wearing it I was setting the time back by one minute almost every day before wearing it.
 

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Fair enough. Next step could be to check to see if it's been magnetised. Some will say that such a small increase can't be due to magnetism, but I had a watch suddenly running 50s fast per day. Checked with a compass and found it would deflect the needle a lot. Got a local guy to wave it over his demagnetiser (no charge) and it returned to normal +8s. Could be worth a try.


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good advice Tritto
 

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Thanks John. I was thinking about this the other day but lost the thread.

How about isochronism?

As I understand it, the amplitude and rate of a watch may vary depending on how wound the mainspring is. Fully wound it may run faster than when it's run down. An expensive movement may be better at keeping a constant rate than a cheaper one.

While you're wearing your watch there a periods when it's not fully wound and maybe the rate slows (say after a night on your bedside table). There are other times when it's fully wound and runs a little faster. This might average out to give you the daily variation you're used to. However, if your watch is on a winder and always fully wound, you only get the fast rate, not the slower rate when it's less wound.

Does this make sense?
 

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Peter912 where are you located...great thinking Tritto...that might be the problem too...but i would think a service is in order too...sure would not hurt...how old is the watch?
 

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Thanks John. I was thinking about this the other day but lost the thread.

How about isochronism?

Does this make sense?
Oddly, a fully wound mainspring makes the watch run slower.

Low end watches will suffer from isochronism but it usually is a matter of 10-maybe 20% % difference MAX between the fully wound and nearly out of wind run rates.

Did you open the back, find the regulator lever/screw, and try slowing it down? As said above, 30 seconds a day may not be good but if there is room to move the regulator towards " - " then try that.

Magnetism could be it too, but not magically. Did you stick your hand into an MRI or the back of an old old TV? If not, doubtful. Any jewler can wave it through his de-mag rig and that will take that out of play.

Good luck !
 

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I vote that it's magnetized . I bought a chinese de-magnetiser on the Bay [$10] to use on a watch that was way too fast . I had seen it on the "Watch repair channel " on Youtube to troubleshoot a watch that was gaining a lot of time . Man , did it ever work good . I regularly do all the watches I acquire or work on now .
Also , I just received a really clean vintage Citizen that was gaining a little bit of time daily. I opened the back , took out the balance and cleaned it in lighter fluid [naphtha] , reassembled the watch and bingo , ...keeping good time now . I guess the hairspring was contaminated , dirty , or oily .
 

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well Ricardo i am amazed that so many watches are in need of good repair...and so few repair shops like they used to be...great to see got your going...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Peter912 where are you located...great thinking Tritto...that might be the problem too...but i would think a service is in order too...sure would not hurt...how old is the watch?
Toronto, Canada

The watch was sent in to repair 3 weeks ago under warranty but hasn't come back yet. The watch is only a little over one year old, around 1 1/2 years that I purchased it.
 

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wow..that does seem very strange for a new watch...i hope they take care of it under warranty too...God Bless John...please let us know when you get it back
 

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How about isochronism?

As I understand it, the amplitude and rate of a watch may vary depending on how wound the mainspring is. Fully wound it may run faster than when it's run down. An expensive movement may be better at keeping a constant rate than a cheaper one.
Does this make sense?
Oddly, a fully wound mainspring makes the watch run slower.

Low end watches will suffer from isochronism but it usually is a matter of 10-maybe 20% % difference MAX between the fully wound and nearly out of wind run rates.
Variations in amplitude occur with variations in mainspring power. A well designed watch (largely due to hairspring material and design) can really narrow this varability down. While older designs tend to speed up with less power (due to less amplitude and faster oscillation rate)...newer designs frequently change little or actually slow down with the lower oscillation rate...again, this is a function of design and selection of hairsping material.

Suffice it to say, the Swiss haven't spent all that money on engineering for naught...(and you thought it was just because they are stubborn). The physical issues are not challenging to conceptualize (or maybe they are)...but they are impossible to completely resolve...at the end of the day you want the narrowest delta and the best offset for errors experienced with normal wearing habits.

Regards, BG
 
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