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Discussion Starter #1
Apologies if this is in the wrong forum - mods, please move if you feel it's appropriate.

Hi guys, I've got a crystal lift as I'm looking to replace the crystals in a couple of my 'fixer-uppers' - once I've done a bit of practicing on some old donor Seikos that I bought for the purpose of tinkering on.

I googled the process of using the lift but try as I might, I could not compress the crystal that is currently sitting in the case to even make it move/rotate! Am I just being weak? It doesn't really matter if break the one that is currently in the case but I'm pretty sure that unless the lift is in a vice with a spanner, I've gone as far as I can with hand power alone!

So in everyone else's experience, how much force should be applied?

And just in case I'm using the wrong type of tool (I don't believe I should I be using a press), the Seiko model is 7025-8010.

Thanks for your help.
 

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I'm not exactly sure of the model you have, but if it is at all like my 7025-8030:

and most other 7025s I've seen - then a crystal lift won't work. To remove the crystal on these (and most other Seikos) you need to remove the caseback, anfd the movement. Thakle off the crystal retaining ring around the crystal and the crystal will push out from the rear (with or without the use of a crystal press).

The only Seikos AFAIK that require a crystal lift are those which have "open thru glass" on the caseback likeon the attached photo.

The steel tension ring on the crystal of most other Seikos makes the use of a crystal lift very hard indeed!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, it's exactly like yours (except in gold).

That puts my mind at rest, shame I didn't realise this before I bought the crystal lift :-[

The movement has been completeley removed. I know it probably sounds like a stupid question but is the crystal retaining ring easy to spot and take out? Although it was late last night, I don't remember seeing anything that was 'gasket like' (maybe I'd already removed it, like I said, it was late!).
 

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I'm only familiar with Orients but it looks the same....


If it is the same then the bezel (arrowed) needs to be removed. See photo below.. (borrowed photo for this purpose)







From the experience I have had with Orients, they can sometimes be a little hard to remove. Firstly, try sliding a razor blade between the case and the bezel to try and open it up a little by pushing it in. Have a close look around the bezel. If you are lucky, there maybe a tiny "indent" where you can insert the blade. Keep it straight so as not to mar the service. What I do then is sit the case on its side with a penknife blade (or similar) in the grove then hit the back of the penknife blade with my palm so it opens the grove further then move around the opening to open it up further until it comes off. Keep all your fingers well away and be aware of where the blade will hit if it were to slip. There are probably better ways of doing this but with limited tools, that is my method and it works for me.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the help guys, I'll give it a try tonight and let you know how I get on.

I've ordered a crystal press from ebay so that's another tool for my toolbox ;)
 

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Is your Seiko equipped with a glass or plastic crystal? Why I ask is that if it is glass then it would be unsuitable for a crystal lift.
 

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WhiteChristmas said:
It's most definitely plastic.

I've found with this this style of case fitted with a domed crystal (see photo), a crystal lift will simply and easily remove it. The later models like you have need to have the bezel (crystal retaining ring) removed and is not suitable for a crystal lift.

 

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kew said:
I'm only familiar with Orients but it looks the same....


If it is the same then the bezel (arrowed) needs to be removed. See photo below.. (borrowed photo for this purpose)

[/b][/font]
[color=rgb(51, 51, 51)]
[color=rgb(51, 51, 51)]
[font=verdana]From the experience I have had with Orients, they can sometimes be a little hard to remove. Firstly, try sliding a razor blade between the case and the bezel to try and open it up a little by pushing it in. Have a close look around the bezel. If you are lucky, there maybe a tiny "indent" where you can insert the blade. Keep it straight so as not to mar the service. What I do then is sit the case on its side with a penknife blade (or similar) in the grove then hit the back of the penknife blade with my palm so it opens the grove further then move around the opening to open it up further until it comes off. Keep all your fingers well away and be aware of where the blade will hit if it were to slip. There are probably better ways of doing this but with limited tools, that is my method and it works for me.[/font]

[font=verdana] :) [/font]
[/quote]
It's just as Kew said, if you look carefully you'll find a slight gap at one point around the crystal retaining ring, it's just big enough for a case knife or small pen knife blade, lever it up and then follow around the edge, the ring will pop off...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks again for your help - I would never have thought that the bezel on the front comes off, but it's kind of obvious now you mention it.

I'll have a go tonight on my practice watches and let you know how I get on.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Re the 7025-8010 - the case is slightly different so no bezel removal was required, just a bit of pressure and the crystal popped out.

So I decided to take it a bit further and replace the crystal on my 7625-8110 Seahorse (due to a star shaped crack). It wasn't too difficult but there is always a worry that something will go wrong (ie, something will slip). I could see where the previous owner(s) had removed the bezel in the past, shame it was at the 6 o'clock position and not 12 (a tip I think I picked up on this forum), but it's not at all bad and it's not like the watch isn't from Dec 1965 (but you know what it's like when you know there's a mark there).

Getting the bezel back on was really hard work - even with my new crystal press (thank goodness I had the foresight to buy one)!

I'm wearing it today to see how the timekeeping is. Any idea if this calibre has the ability to change the date other than turning the hands over a 24 hour period? Nothing happens if I pull the stem out part way.

Thanks again for all your help guys.
 

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Congratulations on doing the job. Regarding the date change..... Although I am unfamiliar with that model, you could try turning the crown so the hour hand goes past 12 midnight, continue to about 3am then turn the hour hand backward to about 9pm then 3am and keep doing that until the correct date is shown. It may work on that model but maybe not. You may need to only move the hand between 10pm and 2pm to get the result....


I don't know if you bought one of those cheap Chinese made crystal presses on eBay but I did and never had a successful "press" with one of those :D


so I ended up buying a more expensive model and it works beautifully. ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #15
kew said:
Regarding the date change..... Although I am unfamiliar with that model, you could try turning the crown so the hour hand goes past 12 midnight, continue to about 3am then turn the hour hand backward to about 9pm then 3am and keep doing that until the correct date is shown.
That worked a treat! :)

Yes, it was a cheap one (cheap in comparison to the brand name ones) - it was hard work! ::)
 
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