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So I guess you wouldent spend the equivalent of 4 1/2 months income on a watch you really really like ? sometimes and only sometimes your heart has got to rule your brain, you may not agree but as you get older you may see the sense in it and from what I can make out your a long time bloody dead :( so we need to live a little while we are able.
My opinion is that buying a desirable vintage watch is more of a trade : cash exchanged for the watch.
The watch has pretty much a world-wide established value so the watch can be re-exchanged for cash at any time. Owning the watch does not incur costs like depreciation, property tax, or maintenance fees. Most likely the cash will be worth less next year due to depreciation

Rolex has used this principle for years.
Personally I'd love to buy into such a nice 6159. Odds are it will be valued even higher next year.
 

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This actually makes for an interesting segue into Seiko collector And collector motivations overall.

For the first 17 years of my life, I had no concept of, appreciation for, or first hand experience with good watches. I saw ads in magazines, or watches in movies or TV shows, and myself and all the other people I knew had watches, but it was just very basic and you took care of them, but not any highly renown or respected types.

Then I spent four years with a 6309 and had ingrained in me the value and respect of a watch as a tool and it’s role. It was ripped from my wrist off the coast doing cast and recoveries and forever lost.


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Then I spent a year with a 7002 which I never liked as much as the 6309 due to different case, no day complication, and worse Lume. And a year later added an H601. I had wanted an H558 like if you were a combat diver or scout swimmer as could sign for at my first unit, but had to turn back in, but this was the closest to buy at the time. Having an alarm or stopwatch was useful a lot in daily life. They were my only two watches for the next seven years. All of these watches jumped out of planes, went diving, were in freezing conditions on mountains to arid deserts to sweltering jungles. Plus everyday use and timing runs, swim times, and all the various things.

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The 7002 has had a trip to Coserve for general maintenance. But no relume or anything. And probably three or four bands/straps. My wife had saved up to surprise me for a year in secret our first year together to replace my lost 6309.

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The H601 has had a trip to coserve, some batteries, and a Ken Setser relume trip.




So, I had been enlisted for eight years, an officer for four, and saved up the first year as a captain and
Then came the Sub.

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Around this time I became interested in placing the lost 6309. I did. But became an avid Seiko collector and other watches as well.

But, it’s hard to connect with a watch when you have so many, some need service, some need to be relumed, etc.

Different fires for different people need to be fed by the fuel of collecting.

For some collectors, the collection itself is the fire. I have seen impressive collections of wines, whiskeys, watches with beautiful display set ups, knives, guns, coins, etc. This is not a huge factor for me.

For some, it’s the completion. I get this. But once I have every variation of a 6217, the thrill of the hunt is gone. I‘m not really going to dive or jump out of planes with them or wear one on target. For a guy whose primary drives are the collection and the completion, this is more important. For a guy whose primary drives are the hunt and the use/connection, the thrill is gone.

For some, it’s using them. This is a bigger point for me. And it can get hard with a big collection. Say you make it a point to buy a 1990 dive computer in 2005, and dive it. But you find another, and another, and another at prices too good to pass. Maybe it’s better to have the single one and dive it than all the various colors and shapes and never dive one. And part of the use fire/drive is the connection. The connection with a single heavy use one is obviously more satisfying.

For some, it’s the knowledge. Finding our about models for the first time, finding rare variations, proving a variation existed,etc. This is a strong drive for me.

For some, it may be a sense of history or other significant time component. This is what drives many to vintage vs being interested in newer models.

For some, it‘s checking them out and comparing them.

Basically, while I like some aspects of collecting, for Me the use, connection, bond, etc. I have found to become the important thing. So, as much as I enjoyed the hunt and thrill of finding and getting every H558 variation, I had no desire to display them, was not going to use them hard, and ended up selling them. In comparison, my wife saved up to surprise me with an H601, I used it for years in many places, I was wearing it when I held my first son, - so much more important.

Or, I enjoyed finding out about and getting all of the 7002 variants, but will probably sell them off. But my first one I used and appreciated and connected with and did lots of stuff in lots of places with. I can see an old picture and know it was on my wrist that day even when it’s not In the picture.



So, my love Seiko began in the 1980s when I became an adult, and was primarily an appreciation, use drive for about 15 years, became a information, hunt, thrill, collection, completist, fan, thing for about a decade, and has morphed back into a realization it’s more a fan of the bang for the buck, use, interest sort of thing for me and that the connection is more important than the collection.

Now, there are a few that escaped my grasp and I never put hands on, like a 6215 or ashtray 600m, but admit I would not spend a months pay to do it.

I‘m not really interested in new models, other than updates, improved performed version of their historical divers. I’m still a fan but sort of dismayed with them not having the role they did in what I consider the heyday of Seiko auto divers in SOF. I like comparing what features and performance they offer with other companies at similar price points.

It amazes me I can log on here and vicariously enjoy the thrill of someone finding that last missing version for their collection, or see nice photos of a pristine example of an old, rare watch, or read as someone has found evidence that their “probably a Franken“ was actually a limited market version in original condition.
 

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^^^^ beautifully done.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Beautifully done, Ramairthree!

Once I got a great condition 6105 last year, I kinda quit looking for and buying Seiko divers. This replaced my lost 6105 that I bought in 1976 from the ship’s store after getting scuba certified while in the USN. The watch that went with me on many miles on top of the sea and on many dives in different oceans. So for me the hunt was over I guess. At least for now...

Tom
 

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That’s pretty unscathed. Glad you got another 6105.

I just couldn’t stop after replacing the 6309, and the hunt led to many other models and kept feeding itself.
 
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