The Watch Site banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The model was a darling on another site and a Japan sold item only when I bought it and may still be. Purchased about 11 years ago, worn twice and stored away since then.

Thing is. I like to wind my watches. Even if an automatic. I still get some pleasure on winding a little to get them going.

This was the first Seiko I bought and when I went to wind it. The crown just kept spinning. A friend told me you can't wind it. You just take it and spin it around to get the rotor running which wound the watch.

Where was the fun in that I thought. 2 little gears added to the watch to allow hand winding which Seiko chose not to do.

So I spun it around. Backwards and forwards and wore the watch. The next day it was dead. Did the winding dance again and wore the watch. Next day it was dead.

Stored the watch away and this is the first time it's seen the light of day for this picture and then back into the box



DON
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,179 Posts
That's odd that the reserve didn't last until the next day. This movement should have over 40 hours of reserve so it should not have been dead the next day. My guess is that your watch is in need of a little mechanical TLC. I hope that your watch hasn't colored your opinion of the brand as a whole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,319 Posts
How long did you 'spin' the watch?
You should do it gently for a few minutes if you want to reach full reserve.
Better yet, quick start it by spinning it for a few minutes and wear it for a while, then try it again, the PR should last 40 hours, if not, then indeed it needs to go to the watch doctor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I spun it both ways for about a minute and wore all day, so not sure what the problem is. The watch worked during the day, but stopped the next morning.

The main dissapointment was the not being able to handwind which one of the joys in owning a mechanical watch.

I would have it checked if any of my newphews or nieces wanted to wear it, but neither do and watch is too small for me now (having worn 44 mm for the last 10 years)

DON
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,179 Posts
in all fairness, seiko has done this with many of their entry level movements for decades. I've heard it say that in part the reason is simplification of the movement thus making it more robust. It stands to reason since Seiko's movements traditionally are not modular, so they can get away with making them as simply and relatively tough as possible.

Thankfully for those who prefer greater variety, these types of mechanical are not all seiko does or has done. They have a whole bunch of hand windable movements, both vintage and current, and a great many of them are in large cases that would better suit your tastes. consider looking deeper into the brands offerings.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top