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Discussion Starter #1
I've had a 6138-0020 waiting to fix up for a couple of months, however, one thing is stopping me... Getting into the damned thing!

When it came to me, it had the tell tale marks of a hand caseback opener slipping, which I promptly found out for myself too. Soaked it in penetrating fluid, tried again and no result.

So I thought, I'll get a bench mounted one. The only one I found that wasn't extortionately priced for a hobbyist was a Cousins sourced job for £100. I tried that, and it just span the opener assembly instead of the caseback. I stripped it down, and rebuilt it with high strength threadlock... Failure, same problem.
No worries, I took it into work and welded it up, this would be the way forwards. Ended up snapping one of the inserts instead.

Getting frustrated now, I knew deep down it needs shocking. Trying a screwdriver, (yes I know, but I'm a rough arse powerstation fitter!) and a hammer, all I succeeded in doing was starting to knocking it out of the case holder.
We'll go with a vice then... But I can't get enough purchase on it without absolutely tearing up the case, or destroying the caseback's edges with the screwdriver.

The really frustrating part of all this is the watch runs, I just need to get in to make it usable.
The only option I see left is heat, but I fear that'll kill the watch once and for all :(
 

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Maybe more penetrating oil, some wood and the vice and a a six prong seiko caseback opener.
I can't see why a little heat applied to the caseback will kill it?
Last resort screwdriver and hammer on caseback edges!!
Casebacks are not that important.
 

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Had a 7290 like that

The case back was a mess anyway so what I did was to get
a Hacks Saw blade, held the case sideways, and slowly cut
away along one part of the case back till it made a little hole
and I could continue to cut until I could get a grip so as to
loosen the threads rim on it.
Barbaric, but it gave me the excess to loosen the case back
thread of the back cover.
Don't cut the case area, just the messed up cover along
those remover notch's very slowly.
Then I junked the case back anyway, it was shot from the start.
The watch was worth saving from that terrible case back on it,
and the watch was spotless and excellent inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The caseback will probably clean up, I'm reluctant to destroy it and then try find another one appropriate to the watch.

I'm concerned about burning something out behind it, I've only got OxyAcetylene at my disposal, which isn't overly accurate!

I've already tried the screwdriver & hammer.

I could try buying a six prong opener, it'll probably just slip out again though. Worth a shot before getting medieval.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Crazy glue? Never heard of that in the UK. What kind of glue is it?

I've ordered a six prong opener.
 

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Crazy glue? Never heard of that in the UK. What kind of glue is it?

I've ordered a six prong opener.
Crazy glue is superglue.
I'd be tempted to use some high strength loctite to bond a piece of flat bar across the back, it can be removed with heat or solvent later on.
A good tip for undoing seized fasteners is to tighten them up first.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's beyond tightening up, this isn't my first rodeo with tight fasteners!

High strength loctite... As in an epoxy?
 

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Put a pair of soft jaws on the vice, cut two bits of soft wood slightly shorter than the length of the watch (lug end to lug lug end) Clamp the case into the vice so the lugs are just biting into the soft jaws and at the same time clamp in the wood either side hard against the case.
With it squarely clamped attack it with a 2lb ball pein and a small blunt cold chisel (Take the chisel edge off with a grinder)
If your worried that the crown might get damaged, you can always drill out a recess in the wood for it.

It worked for me.
 

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It's beyond tightening up, this isn't my first rodeo with tight fasteners!

High strength loctite... As in an epoxy?
No, loctite as in high strength threadlock.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Soft Jaws are just Brass sheets or bars, you can make them.

Never seen brass ones. Thought I'd be able to nick a set from work tonight but it seems we don't have any on the hundreds of vices we have.

I've got a few more options until it comes to soft jaws and a chisel anyway.
 

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Don't like the ideas about chisels personally. Sounds like disaster waiting to happen. Soft jaws just use some ally sheet and cut it to size then hammer it over the vice jaws. Personally I'd wait for your 6 prong tool and if that doesn't work how about some heat using a hair dryer? Hoping it's not cross threaded!

The glue method seems a good alternative! There is a chap here that tried it and it worked: http://forums.watchuseek.com/f21/how-remove-super-tight-seiko-screw-case-back-691973.html

No, loctite as in high strength threadlock.
Loctite is a brand :smiley: Loctite 243 & 270 are their thread lockers. Loctite do a Super Glue product. They also do a 'industrial strength' Super Glue which is amazing stuff but I'm not sure how easy it will be to get the glued nut off the watch back after using it :cheesy:

Good luck!
 

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My 3 cents worth.
A vice with aluminium , brass , bronze jaw inserts. A cold chisel but blunt like a screw driver. A matching (as in appropriate size) Ball Penn hammer.
The screw driver approach isn't doing it because the plastic type handle is absorbing too much impact/shock.
A small blunt cold chisel would be better along with an appropriate size hammer.

In the end though I'd have to also say that experience wielding these tools is a bonus.
Hit it too soft too many times is as bad as hitting it too hard just the once.
Same with getting the angle of the chisel right as you give it a whack:) along with the tightness of the vice.
Only one way to learn though and as my first boss often said to me..." The slowest way of learning is often the most thorough way of learning"

Thirty years on I'm now agreeing with him ::08:
 

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May sound silly, but I have found the chill and quench method effective. 1-2 hrs in the freezer and immerse in warm water a couple of times.
 

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May sound silly, but I have found the chill and quench method effective. 1-2 hrs in the freezer and immerse in warm water a couple of times.
I agree, but with boiling water followed by ice water in shorter cycles to break the corrosion.
 

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Don't like the ideas about chisels personally. Sounds like disaster waiting to happen. Soft jaws just use some ally sheet and cut it to size then hammer it over the vice jaws. Personally I'd wait for your 6 prong tool and if that doesn't work how about some heat using a hair dryer? Hoping it's not cross threaded!

The glue method seems a good alternative! There is a chap here that tried it and it worked: http://forums.watchuseek.com/f21/how-remove-super-tight-seiko-screw-case-back-691973.html


Loctite is a brand :smiley: Loctite 243 & 270 are their thread lockers. Loctite do a Super Glue product. They also do a 'industrial strength' Super Glue which is amazing stuff but I'm not sure how easy it will be to get the glued nut off the watch back after using it :cheesy:

Good luck!
Loctite do a range of threadlocking fluids - 243 and 270 are just a couple of them.
In the UK at least, they were pretty much the only threadlocker available for years and the "high strength" ones are all made from cyano acrylate - eg super glue.
Loctite debonder can be used to dissolve it and heat weakens it - hence my comment.
 
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