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Discussion Starter #1
Good Day All,

Its been a while since my last Seiko project and I thought I would revisit an old friend the Solar Chronograph - most likely a SSC017.

My thoughts are to change the hour/minute hands and I can't seem to find a reliable reference to hand sizes anywhere [unless my searches are rubbish]. Just wondered if anybody knows or can point to reference data.

You help is as always very much appreciated. I think these models are cracking value, well built and with a few small improvements can be made even more beautiful and practical. I found the diver style hands a little out of place - even though it is clearly a Seiko Divers Chronograph so why not!!

Cheers,
Woz

 

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You'd want to make sure the replacement hands are approximately the same weight and have the same height on their pipe, but I measure 110/65 for the hour wheel/cannon pinion diameters.
 

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You'd want to make sure the replacement hands are approximately the same weight and have the same height on their pipe, but I measure 110/65 for the hour wheel/cannon pinion diameters.
Thanks, that's good advice all round :)

I take it weight is a factor as the solar/quartz movement is not as strong as say a automatic mechanical movement or even the old 7548 quartz for example?

It's the first time I've heard of weight in this context... but I've no experience with this movement other than owning one!

Many thanks 👍
 

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My advice is more in general for all modding, but yes, Quartz calibers typically are lower torque-producing than their mechanical counterparts. Even mechanical calibers have specs for weight and imbalance amounts to ensure there is not more resistance imparted to the functioning of the watch than it is designed to handle.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
My advice is more in general for all modding, but yes, Quartz calibers typically are lower torque-producing than their mechanical counterparts. Even mechanical calibers have specs for weight and imbalance amounts to ensure there is not more resistance imparted to the functioning of the watch than it is designed to handle.
Good advice indeed... I know i can always count on people here to share great knowledge. Big thanks for responding sir.

Edit: 65/110/20 seems to be the consensus around the block for Seiko Quartz popular sizes.
 
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