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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,


I've read a few posts and articles about self regulating by watch position. It seems my newer 7s26 movement is losing a few seconds per night when I leave it face up. This is opposite of the information in the article I found presumably for Rolex movements, see picture below. Has anyone found that their Seiko movement can be slightly regulated by leaving it in a certain position overnight, ie. crown down, crown up, face up, etc? Do various automatic movements behave differently in these positions or should the affects be similar?


Thanks,
Curt
 

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Not only will position at rest affect the time keeping, Curt, but whether the watch is on your wrist or off has an effect too. My 6309 loses a little time on the wrist, and gains a little when off and rested dial up. I've observed it long enough that I have figured out how I can make the watch run at COSC spec if I adjust wear time accordingly.
 

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I love that topic, but I have to admit, that as a German speaker I normally ,ix accuracy with precision.
However. if your watch has the same gain/loss, whether it's worn, face down, crown up etc. .. You're a happy camper!
How big that loss is, is basically not important (unless decreased significantly) - it can be easily regulated.
A watch running between 20 and 25 fast a day over all positions is preferable to one running 0 on the wrist, but plus-minus 5s/d in different positions.

Cheers,

Axel
 

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Like children, every watch is different. Sometimes they act just like the book says they should and sometimes they don't. You just have to experiment with each one.
 

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Maybe "position regulating" does not work for Seiko 7S, but why does it work for Rolex?
Why does Rolex lose a few seconds when the crown is up or down? What is the physics behind this? How come the same physics does not apply to Seiko 7S?

seikomatic said:
no use for low end 7s
 

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junlon said:
Maybe "position regulating" does not work for Seiko 7S, but why does it work for Rolex?
Why does Rolex lose a few seconds when the crown is up or down? What is the physics behind this? How come the same physics does not apply to Seiko 7S?
All mechanical watches will display some degree of positional variation. The tourbillon was an attempt to remove as much positional variation as possible and may be the closest to removing it.

The physics is that the balance spring and balance wheel itself are all affected by gravity and will behave differently in different positions.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys for you comments and insight. I find it interesting how different movements can be regulated slightly by position instead of regulating them mechanically. I've had my SKX009 for over four months now and wear it every day and enjoy how rugged it is.


seikomatic - There may be a language barrier at work here. You may need to have someone explain the topic to you in order to understand what we are discussing. Thanks for your input.


Curt
 

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seikomatic said:
better try this:

(1) Open your IE
(2) type [url=http://www.google.com]www.google.com[/url]
(3) pRESS enter
(4) Type : how to regulate 7s26
(5) Press enter
[/quote]
There is no need for sarcasm. We all learned at some point. please cut the newer guys some slack and direct them to the content if you can, but please avoid these types of replies going forward. Thanks.
 

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Pin Guan Pete -
I think you misunderstood my question. I understand watch position can affect the accuracy. What I don't understand is why Rolex movement "loses", instead of "gaining", a few seconds at night when the crown is up or down.
Likewise, why does Rolex movement "gain" a few seconds, instead of "losing" a few, when placing dial up?
I got the similar positional variationd in my Seiko SARB027 (6R15 movement).

Pin said:
All mechanical watches will display some degree of positional variation. The tourbillon was an attempt to remove as much positional variation as possible and may be the closest to removing it.

The physics is that the balance spring and balance wheel itself are all affected by gravity and will behave differently in different positions.
 

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junlon said:
Pin Guan Pete -
I think you misunderstood my question. I understand watch position can affect the accuracy. What I don't understand is why Rolex movement "loses", instead of "gaining", a few seconds at night when the crown is up or down.
Likewise, why does Rolex movement "gain" a few seconds, instead of "losing" a few, when placing dial up?
I got the similar positional variationd in my Seiko SARB027 (6R15 movement).
A lot depends on the position of the balance in the watch movement. Generally the balance can be found directly opposite the the 3 o'clock position in the watch. Some manufacturers place the balance in other positions so resting them in, lets say a crown down position will cause gravity to affect the balances differently.

There is more to it than just the balance as well; the positioning and adjustment of the escapement plays a big part in this too. With simple calibres like a 7s26 which has had no adjustments made to it, it is conceivable that two different movements might behave radically differently; ie one might gain a bit in the crown down position while another might lose a bit.

Because a Rolex is adjusted in 5 or 6 positions and regulated to COSC standards, it is pretty easy to say that they will always gain or lose when in such and such a position(although it will be a very small amount).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Pin said:
A lot depends on the position of the balance in the watch movement. Generally the balance can be found directly opposite the the 3 o'clock position in the watch. Some manufacturers place the balance in other positions so resting them in, lets say a crown down position will cause gravity to affect the balances differently.

There is more to it than just the balance as well; the positioning and adjustment of the escapement plays a big part in this too. With simple calibres like a 7s26 which has had no adjustments made to it, it is conceivable that two different movements might behave radically differently; ie one might gain a bit in the crown down position while another might lose a bit.

Because a Rolex is adjusted in 5 or 6 positions and regulated to COSC standards, it is pretty easy to say that they will always gain or lose when in such and such a position(although it will be a very small amount).

Would the anti-shock system play a part too? Incabloc vs Kif vs Diashock, etc? Regarding the different affects of the watch positions we seem to be experiencing.


Curt
 

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curtisjf said:
Would the anti-shock system play a part too? Incabloc vs Kif vs Diashock, etc? Regarding the different affects of the watch positions we seem to be experiencing.


Curt
I wouldn't think that a shock absorber system would have much affect when the watch is sitting stationary. They are all just methods of allowing the pivot jewels to move around a little during hard G- forces from bumps and knocks to the casing.
 
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