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Filling another page from the 1973 catalogue. Not so hard this time with only three 89 caliber stopwatches, the 1/5s, the 1/10s and the 1/100s. Small mechanical marvels at the end of the era of mechanical stopwatches. Not cheap at 25000 yen, 26000 yen and 32000 yen respectively. For comparision, 32000 yen is the same as the most expensive KS watch this year, the KS Special Chronometer.



- martin
 

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Beautiful!! I'd love to see the inner workings of those :)
 

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Hi Martin,
Thank you for sharing those. I've always wondered about the specific functioning of the hands of the 1/100 model, can you tell me more about it? The short, centrally-mounted hand, what happens to it once it passes the 10? Have you seen a user manual for the 89 series? I recently got my first Seiko stopwatch, an 88 series 1/10 sec. I don't know how much they share with the 89 series (having troubles finding an 89 tech guide), but below is a shot under the dial of the 8800D movement. I'm pretty sure it was never serviced before; the excess, somewhat sloppy lubrication on the chronograph parts from the factory was interesting to see:


Not to go off track too much, but I wonder if the 89 series has the same rubber bumper on the end of the second-setting lever? It comes against the fourth wheel teeth when the stopwatch is in the "stop" and "reset" conditions, and over the years mine had an impression of the teeth molded into the rubber:


This was causing slight issues with errant stopping/starting (just by a few tenths of a second), but flipping the bumper around on its post solved the problem. For this reason, I'd advise the 88 series stopwatches to be left in the "start" condition when not in use.
 

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Stopwatch

Hi Noah, the minute hand just continues after 10 as well. It is continuous rather than jumping. Very little descriptive materials, the two page manual just says what the buttons do. There are a few pics of the 1/5 and the 1/10 calibers but I have not seen any of the 1/100 (and I cant open the caseback). It is absolutely 360000 bph though.

- martin
 

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Great stuff Martin:clap:
Looks like many of my friends are the same...



Actually, just 2 what I know of have this truly amazing set.








Quite an step above the 88's.

/B.
 
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