The Watch Site banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I've just joined this site as I have been a Seiko Fan for many years and have a couple of them. I recently bought a Gold face 7s26 02w0 as a bit of a project. I've already had a go at reworking the metal finishes and open to advice but the main issue I have is that when I got the watch it was loosing 5 minutes a day. I've adjusted it a couple of times but the speed adjustment doesnt seem to reflect it's movement. First i advanced it and it was gaining minutes a day now when I go back to the same central position it doesnt seem to return to the losing 5 minutes a day. Any advice would be gratefully received. Oh and here is a picture of the work I've done so far. Cheap eBay buy on the left. After a weekend of tinkering on the right. Still not finished yet.
IMG_20210718_200502.jpg
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
7,632 Posts
You really need a timegrapher to adjust the A and B levers. Just pushing one back and forth is a fool’s game. The shape of the trace tells a lot, too.

A brand new 7S26C can be had for $35 or so so swapping in a modern one is always a viable path if need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Really examine the balance spring under a loupe or magnifying glass for ANY foreign material. I.e. hair, dust, q-tip fiber etc. anything will throw it out of whack. Also look to make sure the balance spring is evenly round and not bunched up to one side. If one of those I listed is happening. Have it serviced. Don’t mess with that spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You really need a timegrapher to adjust the A and B levers. Just pushing one back and forth is a fool’s game. The shape of the trace tells a lot, too.

A brand new 7S26C can be had for $35 or so so swapping in a modern one is always a viable path if need be.
I love the idea of owning a timegrapher but seemed an expensive option as a newly started hobbyist. Where would you recommend purchasing a 7s26c from. And how much would a sensible service cost. I was hoping I could just clean it up and nudge on the timing in my naivety 🤔
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Really examine the balance spring under a loupe or magnifying glass for ANY foreign material. I.e. hair, dust, q-tip fiber etc. anything will throw it out of whack. Also look to make sure the balance spring is evenly round and not bunched up to one side. If one of those I listed is happening. Have it serviced. Don’t mess with that spring.
I'll have a look at it closely. How much should a service cost me as a noob?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I'll have a look at it closely. How much should a service cost me as a noob?
Service at a local jeweler could be $125-175. You can look at esslinger.com for the movement. Depending how novice you are to the craft, it may be worth the service if you have never removed/reset dial, hands or swapped day wheels.
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
7,632 Posts
Well, you can service a 7S26 so that the original movement is still inside the case. For sentamentality I find that notion charming. For a watch you bought on the cheap to have a low cost reliable tonekeepervwhy pay a watch guy to service it when a new one is faster, cheaper and better?

A brand new 7S26C from a watch parts house or ebay is about $40. USD. Cheaper from SeikonUSS but you need to be an authorized parts dealer to get that they don't sell movements to the public.

Or drop in an NH36 (4R36) that hand winds and hacks for another $20 or so.
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
7,632 Posts
Seiko USA will do the work for you by installing a brand new 7S26C with new gaskets for $87 plus tax and shipping - figure $100 all in:
Screenshot_20210720-082929.png
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
1,920 Posts
For a DIY'er, a timegrapher is the best solution, but there are some smartphone apps you could try. Until I bought a cheap timegrapher, I was using the app Kello, which uses the microphone in a wired headset to listen to the movement and approximate the rate (doesn't tell you antyhing about beat error, or show traces, so it's pretty limited). It can be a bit fiddly to position the microphone just right, but will relieve some of the frustration of guess-wait-check like you're doing now. Maybe worth a shot until you either buy a timegrapher or decide its time to take it to a local professional.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I have only once been lucky when regulating a watch without a timegrapher. Subtle movement is an understatement.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top