The Watch Site banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I have recently acquired a Seiko 'Bishop' which mecanically is very good and working fine, but cosmetically needs some TLC.

The strap is worn and broken, but I'm hopeful it is fixable.

The bezel is quite worn and it's markings worn a bit. It is also very slack and loose when turning.

What I would like to know, is does anyone know where I can get a replacement bezel and insert for this model from?

Maybe where I can get a strap from as well Incase the one I have isn't repairable?

Does anyone have any experience of repainting these models to the same original colour and finish and can pass on sage advice?

All help as ever greatly appreciated from the guys on this forum!

Cheers

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've taken a couple of shots. As you can see from the strap, the break is towards the head and has been bent pulled out.





It looks like the previous owner has tried to prise open the link to put it in, but either stopped or wasn't successful.


Overall the strap is worn and needs really to be touched up:





Here are a couple of shots of the head: -








The head ideally needs to be touched up as well due to the head being silver in places and not black.


If you have any suggestions, I would be very grateful.


Thanks again in advance.


Cheers


Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
While Bishop models are extremely collectable the people who collect them only seem to want them in like new condition. The be brutally honest that bracelet is destroyed in all practicality.
Still there is nothing wrong with having a go at trying to make the best out of what you have. New parts are non existent. Sometimes a part will show up on eBay. I believe a seller has both a silver and a black NOS bracelet with the flat link type. He is asking $500 US for each.
If you have the desire and talent you could possible break the watch all the way down to its bare metal parts and repaint them. It may not be the original way it was done but it would sure look better than it does now. As it sits it does not have much collector value as it sits anyway. If done properly it can be repainted and look decent. The finish will not be as durable as the original but at least you could wear it on your wrist with pride.

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the comments Michael.

I'm going to give it a good go to see what I can do to it.

Do you know anyone who has repainted them that could pass on any advice / comments on what they did and how they achieved it?

Cheers

Scott
 

·
Craftsman
Joined
·
527 Posts
Hi Scott,

I don't think you will find any factual (e.g. with evidence) information relating to repainting (or re-coating) this type of watch and bracelet.

The only thing that comes close is a ceracoated 7548 (which included case, bezel and crown - but not bracelet, it was on a strap).

There are lots of problems to be overcome:

1 - removing the old, two part finish and / or rubbing it down so that the new finish that is applied isn't affected by the coatings underneath

2 - ensuring that the new finish that is applied doesn't change the dimensions of any part that comes into contact with another part (e.g. bezel to case, crown to case, pusher to case)

3 - ensuring that the new finish that is applied doesn't immediately start to flake off. This is a particular problem with the bracelet links and clasp which due to their nature have to contact each other


My opinion (and it is only that) is that you might achieve a cosmetically pleasing look by re-painting the watch, but it will no longer be functional (and by that I mean that either parts will no longer function - e.g. the bezel won't turn) or it will not last (e.g. as soon as you wear it and try and use it the finish will come off).

I would love to be proved wrong (I have a 7A28-6000 that could really do with being re-finished) but I doubt that I will (unless someone throws a large amount of money at a specialist company).

The only option you have with your broken bracelet is to straighten the two 'pins'. As one is bent at 90 degrees to where it should be, there is the real risk that it will either a) snap off, or b) will be so weakened by being bent and straightened that it will simply bend again.

As has been pointed out, you have nothing to lose, but be aware that the bracelet will be significantly weakened at this link and could easily break / fail when you are wearing the watch causing the watch to fall ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all your comments guys.

There is obviously a lot of love for this model, but not much confidence in getting them back to some sort of original condition.

I'm determined to give it a good go, so I'll post some pictures once I'm done to get some feedback!

Cheers

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
Hey have fun and enjoy yourself. You will find many in this hobby that will turn their nose up at a collectable watch like that being repaired. Ignore them. Enjoy yourself and see what you can do to put that watch back in the best condition you can. The only one who has to like it is you. I myself have always enjoyed the feeling of accomplishment when repairing a broken watch. it takes skill an patience but to me it is extremely enjoyable.

Michael
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top