The Watch Site banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, i recently was given this watch from my father in law who passed away, I know he told me he bought it new in the 70's. everything seems to work, but the top chronograph button tends to stick, and the crystal is scratched. I'd like to get this watch cleaned up and the crystal changed, but would like to know on average what would this cost me? Is it worth getting fixed or should i just leave it like this (would this impact the value in any way)? I don't know much about watches, although i was suprised to read up on the watch and how popular it still was.



Watch Analog watch Clock Watch accessory Font
Watch Hand Analog watch Automotive lighting Clock
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
I would say it is well worth the cost of a service, several master watchmakers here who specialize in these watches and 100s of collectors who also specialize in these :) Very nice!
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
8,956 Posts
I am sure you know but the serial number dates it to March 1971.

Everything checks out for originality. That makes it well worth the cost of a proper movement service if you want to wear it regularly.

The stuck pusher is 90%+ likely due to an old hardened pusher o-ring. No big deal if that's the case.


Whatever you do keep it to remember your Dad is valued won't go down unless you are hard pressed for cash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am sure you know but the serial number dates it to March 1971.

Everything checks out for originality. That makes it well worth the cost of a proper movement service if you want to wear it regularly.

The stuck pusher is 90%+ likely due to an old hardened pusher o-ring. No big deal if that's the case.


Whatever you do keep it to remember your Dad is valued won't go down unless you are hard pressed for cash.
Thank you! Of course i am keeping it without a doubt, my question was mostly regarding the "authenticity" when changing parts like the crystal, As i mostly don't want to degrade the watch by having parts replaced.
 

·
Craftsman
Joined
·
2,269 Posts
I am seeing the first two numbers of the serial # as 43 which would be March 74 manufacture date. Sticking buttons means the seals are hardened and need replacement. Happy to assist you with service if you need help. I have restored dozens of these 6139s. PM me if you have any questions. John

PS - Very nice original piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am seeing the first two numbers of the serial # as 43 which would be March 74 manufacture date. Sticking buttons means the seals are hardened and need replacement. Happy to assist you with service if you need help. I have restored dozens of these 6139s. PM me if you have any questions. John

PS - Very nice original piece.
Hi, the 2 first numbers are 13, dirt was right beside the 1 which kinda makes it look like a 4. but anyhow, thanks for the offer, i brought it today to a watch repair near my place.
 

·
Special Member
Joined
·
431 Posts
Hi, the 2 first numbers are 13, dirt was right beside the 1 which kinda makes it look like a 4. but anyhow, thanks for the offer, i brought it today to a watch repair near my place.
The 6139 movement is quite a complicated one and certainly not that I would trust to just any watch repair place.
Make sure your watch repair place has experience and tools to work on this movement. Far too many 613x has been ruined by repair place that didnt know what they were doing.

My suggestion is take up the offer from the experts here.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top