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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys.

My seiko 6138 that I bought like 5 years ago came with acrylic crystal. And I saw one with mineral crystal and looks so much better so I decided to change it.

Does any one has the pictures that explain the anatomy of this so I can clearly see what parts I need. I am expecting that once I remove the acrylic the gasket that sits below the crystal would be gone, and mostly the crystal ring should be gone too. But I don’t want to open the watch and remove the crystal without first knowing what I am getting into.

Please post your pictures and if you know of sellers that have the parts even better!!

Thanks!


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Your UFO uses crystal 340W14GN. If you do not have one, you could source one off the internet via ebay, or from one of the reputable crystal suppliers. I will PM you with the names of a few crystal suppliers to try and locate a crystal. The crystal gaskets are pretty durable and made out of viton rubber. Most of the time you can gently clean it in a bit of rubbing alcohol and you are good to go. Unless the gasket is damaged or cracked, you should be okay but can source a new gasket if needed. It is usually the case back and pusher seals that dry up hard as a rock and need to be replaced.

As for the installation, you will need to remove the case back, remove the winding weight and the crown and lift the movement ring while holding the two pushers so they do not go fly off. The movement ring retains the pushers so keep this in mind when you reinstall. After all this is removed, you can gently turn the case over using a case cushion and lift the case straight up leaving the movement behind. Cover the movement with a glass or something to keep dust off of it while you work.

Next, you will need a good case knife and some clear plastic wrap like a sandwich bag or square piece of a freezer bag. Locate the slight chamfer in the bezel edge were it meets the case. Holding the case in our hand, use the case knife edge behind the clear plastic to go into the chamfer where the bezel meets the case. Gently pry upward until you see the bezel start to separate from the case. You will need to be deliberate and use a good deal of force. Gentily work the case knife around the lifted edge and the bezel will come off exposing the crystal and crystal gasket. You can then go into the inside of the case with your thumbs and press the crystal out. Be careful removing the gasket taking care not to stretch or tear it. You may need to go around the edge of the gasket and case with your case back blade to gently loosen the edge of the gasket from the case. Clean the gasket in rubbing alcohol and clean all the case parts and bezel in warm soapy water with a tooth brush. Dry thoroughly.

Next, you will need a good crystal press with a die that fits the outer diameter of the bezel in order to reinstall it. The gasket is L shaped and will sit down a channel in the case flush against the side. You then need to take your new crystal and work in down into the L gasket using hand pressure only. I wear rubber surgical gloves to make things easier. Once you get the crystal in place with the seal edges even around the entire crystal, you are ready to install the bezel. I carefully install the movement with crown without pushers and gently put the case back on. You can then line up the 60 mark to the sweep second hand to press the bezel back in place. I usually place a piece of clear plastic between the die and the bezel. If your dies are made of plastic you could go without the plastic. You will hear a snap when the bezel snaps on to the case. Then all you have to do is turn the watch over and reinstall the pushers, movement ring, winding weight, and case back. Keep in mind you will need to slightly depressed the pushers with one hand and drop the movement ring in so that it catches the ends of the pushers and retains them. Install the winding weight and close up the case. There is a bit more detail to all this but this is what I go through in general. Good luck with it.
 

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VE has explained what to do very well but for such a one off small job you could buy the glass and get a local watchmaker to do it or send it to a skilled person here who could do it in 5 minutes.
 

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I'm just curious - why do you need to remove the winding weight rotor?

I may be doing it wrong here (great chance of this!) but i've never removed the rotor when taking a movement out of a case?
 

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I'm just curious - why do you need to remove the winding weight rotor?

I may be doing it wrong here (great chance of this!) but i've never removed the rotor when taking a movement out of a case?




Agreed - no need to remove.
There are a few Swiss watches where the rotor is set in the case ring and it might be a good idea to remove it.
 

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I'm just curious - why do you need to remove the winding weight rotor?

I may be doing it wrong here (great chance of this!) but i've never removed the rotor when taking a movement out of a case?
Hey, do what you want. Technically speaking, you probably do not have to remove the winding weight but I find it makes the movement ring much easier to deal with during removal and reinstallation given you need to manage the pushers. Good luck with it.
 

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Hey, do what you want. Technically speaking, you probably do not have to remove the winding weight but I find it makes the movement ring much easier to deal with during removal and reinstallation given you need to manage the pushers. Good luck with it.
Very true and only takes a few moments too...i like removing them myself
God Bless,John

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Discussion Starter #9
Not sure if this is what you meant by picture but hopefully this helps.


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Actually this is perfect, plus the first response's description. Its funny how each watch is different, I was under the impression there were two gaskets. One to sit the crystal on, and another to around the crystal. Or a single L shaped gasket. That sits and hugs at the same time.



Between the tachy-bezel and the case its a friction fit that is pop'ed into place? And placed again with a crystal press?


Thanks!
 

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That's funny. I always replace the (normally beat up) glass crystal for acrylic. I'd rather have that since I can actually polish acrylic. My watchmaker does it for a few bucks. I don't have the patience or skill.
 
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