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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone.

I am relatively new to purchasing some of the vintage Seiko watches.

I recently bought the below watch and it looks like the dial is crumbling around the edges. Is this normal for this watch as it is so old? 50 years...

I love the watch but wondered about if restoration or replacement makes sense...should I leave it be? What would most of you say about the state of the dial? It looks like someone chewed the edges...lol
 

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It is quite common to see, at least half of the vintage KS watches I see have either oil staining or dial paint lifting at the edge of the dial. One was so inexpensive I was going to try a "fix" I have had in mind, I have a variable speed turntable if you will that spins ever so slowly, it was constructed to do faux wood finish on gumball machines, I bought it in an estate lot and have yet to ever use it for anything, but it has some very expensive parts including a reduction gear assembly. Once I am actually retired I am going to get it out and start playing around with it, I made some watch dial fixtures for my lathe back when I was doing watch modding that would be easy to adapt to the turntable. My idea would essentially paint a rim around the edge of the dial to stabilize the paint loss, but the watch's value would still be as a "redial" since most of the value in a vintage watch is related directly to dial condition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My idea would essentially paint a rim around the edge of the dial to stabilize the paint loss, but the watch's value would still be as a "redial" since most of the value in a vintage watch is related directly to dial condition.
So, am I correct in interpreting that what I am looking at is paint chipping/loss and not actual loss of the dial material itself? I don't have the watch in hand yet but the pictures seem like the disc itself is chipped, don't they?

Also, very cool to hear about your lathe. I am not a huge NOS guy, and I think there are a lot of vintage Seiko's that could be used as great mod candidates as they have lost their NOS value in their condition. As such, why not make them very cool the way many of the modern premium divers are modded? There just isn't much out there for vintage mod options that I have seen.

If you ever get to looking at specialising in modding some vintage watch pieces, I am up for sponsoring a project. In car parlance they call it "resto-mod"...perhaps a whole new category of raising some cool vintage Seiko stuff from the dead! Let me know when you do. You may already have a customer.
 

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Looking at the pictures I can't see a crystal tensioning ring. If this is missing a new one will hide a lot of the damage to the edge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looking at the pictures I can't see a crystal tensioning ring. If this is missing a new one will hide a lot of the damage to the edge.
OK...That's great. Will any model 6119 tensioning ring work on the 7803? Or, does the part have to read 6119-7803.

Same question for hands and day/date discs? I am thinking of modding it a bit....

Thanks in advance!
 

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They don't sell tensioner rings separately but here is part number for your watch for the Crystal 300T20ANS0.

Most older Seiko hands are interchangeable. The Day and date should work from any 6119 with the crown at 4 like your watch. I also have a feeling day wheels from a 6309 at 4 should work also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They don't sell tensioner rings separately but here is part number for your watch for the Crystal 300T20ANS0.

Most older Seiko hands are interchangeable. The Day and date should work from any 6119 with the crown at 4 like your watch. I also have a feeling day wheels from a 6309 at 4 should work also.
Wow! Thanks. Very good info.

I have a 6309 with a Thai day disc...very cool. Unfortunately, i couldn't use it as it is a 3 o'clock version...Too bad.

Just doing some searching I did find the crystal with tension ring quite easily.

I am struggling with the hands a bit, but if I keep the 6309 I do find this:

and this:

Just as a point of educating myself, would I be all within the wheel house of using the crystal with the tension ring and hands?

Last question, and I am now derailing own thread, but are these changes a noob should tackle? I mean, I am just speaking hypothetically at this point here for the purpose of learning.

Thanks, everyone!
 

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So, am I correct in interpreting that what I am looking at is paint chipping/loss and not actual loss of the dial material itself? I don't have the watch in hand yet but the pictures seem like the disc itself is chipped, don't they?

Also, very cool to hear about your lathe. I am not a huge NOS guy, and I think there are a lot of vintage Seiko's that could be used as great mod candidates as they have lost their NOS value in their condition. As such, why not make them very cool the way many of the modern premium divers are modded? There just isn't much out there for vintage mod options that I have seen.

If you ever get to looking at specialising in modding some vintage watch pieces, I am up for sponsoring a project. In car parlance they call it "resto-mod"...perhaps a whole new category of raising some cool vintage Seiko stuff from the dead! Let me know when you do. You may already have a customer.
Yes it is paint loss, flaking and peeling. Thank you for the offer :) I am currently doing a resto-mod on an 81 Celica GT :)
 
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