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Yesterday I had to say good bye to my beloved dog. It broke my heart to have to make the decision to have her euthanized, the hardest decision I've ever had to make. A few weeks ago she started getting sick, she stopped eating and didn't want to do anything except lay there. We brought her to the vet and she had a high white cell blood count. She was fighting some kind of infection. After a few days she wasn't getting any better, back to the vet. An x-ray showed a tumored kidney, very swollen. My baby girl had cancer. We took her home with some steroids and pain meds. They didn't help, she was hurting and no chance of her recovering. Tuesday night we were up all night with her. Her breathing was fast and shallow and she was whimpering, she was in so much pain. Wednesday morning we had to make the right choice. The vet gave her a heavy dose of anesthetic and she was no longer in pain. We held her and comforted her until she fell into a deep sleep. The next shot was an overdose, it was over within a minute. She was gone, no longer suffering, no longer in any pain. My wife and are devastated, my poor Shelby girl, my Shelby Shelby Doggie Doggie has passed on. We know we made the right decision but it hurts so much, the house seemed so empty this morning, so quiet. I'm going to miss my gal and hope someday I'll see her again.

My watch dog
448908


Her smile made us so happy
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aaaaaw Jerry I am so so sorry to hear it I really am, the pain is bad really bad I REALLY feel for you and send my sincerest condolences, I lost my Bailey last year and there isent a night go by that I don't wake up looking for him and hoping he will be there, again REALLY sorry to hear about your loss :( :( :(
 

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Hang in there bud. I know it's rough going. Hold on to all those good memories and know she's in a good place now. Prayers and thoughts.
 

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So very sad to read this. But your pain in making that decision took her pain away from her. There is no better way that you could show her how much you loved her.

My thoughts are with you
 

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Very sorry to hear this Jerry. I know exactly how you feel, I had to do exactly the same with one of our cats about 35 years ago, still hurts to think about it...
 

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I certainly feel for you and your family. Losing our beloved best friends is so hard on everyone. Next thing the house is empty like only a dog owner can understand.

Twice I had men who work for me tell me their dog passed away in the morning, and both times I told him take the day off and be with your family. It takes time me to process.

My best wishes to you in your time of loss.
 

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Oh man, so sorry. Heartbreaking, but you took away her pain. She is chasing squirrels somewhere over the rainbow bridge.
The unconditional love they give us is so hard to be without. I always say I wish I was the man my dog thinks I am.
Best wishes to you, my friend.

Rob
 

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Thank you for all the kind words and condolences fellas. It's never easy when a pet passes and I know a lot have been through this as well, my heart goes out to you too.
 

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“Where to Bury A Dog”


By Ben Hur Lampman (1886-1954)

A subscriber of the Ontario Argus has written to the editor of that fine weekly, propounding a certain question, which, so far as we know, yet remains unanswered. The question is this – “Where shall I bury my dog?” It is asked in advance of death.

The Oregonian trusts the Argus will not be offended if this newspaper undertakes an answer, for surely such a question merits a reply, since the man who asked it, on the evidence of his letter, loves the dog. It distresses him to think of his favorite as dishonored in death, mere carrion in the winter rains. Within that sloping, canine skull, he must reflect when the dog is dead, were thoughts that dignified the dog and honored the master. The hand of the master and of the friend stroked often in affection this rough, pathetic husk that was a dog.

We would say to the Ontario man that there are various places in which a dog may be buried. We are thinking now of a setter, whose coat was flame in the sunshine, and who, so far as we are aware, never entertained a mean or an unworthy thought. This setter is buried beneath a cherry tree, under four feet of garden loam, and at its proper season the cherry strews petals on the green lawn of his grave. Beneath a cherry tree, or an apple, or any flowering shrub of the garden, is an excellent place to bury a good dog.

Beneath such trees, such shrubs, he slept in the drowsy summer, or gnawed at a flavorous bone, or lifted head to challenge some strange intruder. These are good places, in life or in death. Yet it is a small matter, and it touches sentiment more than anything else. For if the dog be well remembered, if sometimes he leaps through your dreams actual as in life, eyes kindling, questing, asking, laughing, begging, it matters not at all where that dog sleeps at long and at last.

On a hill where the wind is unrebuked, and the trees are roaring, or beside a stream he knew in puppyhood, or somewhere in the flatness of a pasture land, where most exhilarating cattle graze. It is all one to the dog, and all one to you, and nothing is gained, and nothing lost -- if memory lives. But there is one best place to bury a dog. One place that is best of all.

If you bury him in this spot, the secret of which you must already have, he will come to you when you call -- come to you over the grim, dim frontiers of death, and down the well-remembered path, and to your side again. And though you call a dozen living dogs to heel they shall not growl at him, nor resent his coming, for he is yours and he belongs there. People may scoff at you, who see no lightest blade of grass bent by his footfall, who hear no whimper pitched too fine for mere audition, people who may never really have had a dog. Smile at them then, for you shall know something that is hidden from them, and which is well worth the knowing. The one best place to bury a good dog is in the heart of its master.
 

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“Where to Bury A Dog”


By Ben Hur Lampman (1886-1954)

A subscriber of the Ontario Argus has written to the editor of that fine weekly, propounding a certain question, which, so far as we know, yet remains unanswered. The question is this – “Where shall I bury my dog?” It is asked in advance of death.

The Oregonian trusts the Argus will not be offended if this newspaper undertakes an answer, for surely such a question merits a reply, since the man who asked it, on the evidence of his letter, loves the dog. It distresses him to think of his favorite as dishonored in death, mere carrion in the winter rains. Within that sloping, canine skull, he must reflect when the dog is dead, were thoughts that dignified the dog and honored the master. The hand of the master and of the friend stroked often in affection this rough, pathetic husk that was a dog.

We would say to the Ontario man that there are various places in which a dog may be buried. We are thinking now of a setter, whose coat was flame in the sunshine, and who, so far as we are aware, never entertained a mean or an unworthy thought. This setter is buried beneath a cherry tree, under four feet of garden loam, and at its proper season the cherry strews petals on the green lawn of his grave. Beneath a cherry tree, or an apple, or any flowering shrub of the garden, is an excellent place to bury a good dog.

Beneath such trees, such shrubs, he slept in the drowsy summer, or gnawed at a flavorous bone, or lifted head to challenge some strange intruder. These are good places, in life or in death. Yet it is a small matter, and it touches sentiment more than anything else. For if the dog be well remembered, if sometimes he leaps through your dreams actual as in life, eyes kindling, questing, asking, laughing, begging, it matters not at all where that dog sleeps at long and at last.

On a hill where the wind is unrebuked, and the trees are roaring, or beside a stream he knew in puppyhood, or somewhere in the flatness of a pasture land, where most exhilarating cattle graze. It is all one to the dog, and all one to you, and nothing is gained, and nothing lost -- if memory lives. But there is one best place to bury a dog. One place that is best of all.

If you bury him in this spot, the secret of which you must already have, he will come to you when you call -- come to you over the grim, dim frontiers of death, and down the well-remembered path, and to your side again. And though you call a dozen living dogs to heel they shall not growl at him, nor resent his coming, for he is yours and he belongs there. People may scoff at you, who see no lightest blade of grass bent by his footfall, who hear no whimper pitched too fine for mere audition, people who may never really have had a dog. Smile at them then, for you shall know something that is hidden from them, and which is well worth the knowing. The one best place to bury a good dog is in the heart of its master.
Thank you.
 

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My condolences, you've been a good boss/carer till the end. I had to make this decision two times in the past and it still upsets me.
 
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