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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question regarding the clasp on a Sawtooth stainless bracelet, but I guess it would apply to any of the triple-folding metal clasps. The two sections that are folded under the clasp (the pieces that are hidden by the top piece and the bracelet) are longer on my Sawtooth bracelet than any other stainless bracelet I have. Since I have small wrists, when I have the bracelet sized to fit, the clasp doesn't quite follow the contour of my wrist. It sticks out a little on the one end (the end with the hinge) and kind of pushes the bracelet links out away from my wrist. If the clasp had a little more bend to it, it would follow the contour of my wrist much better. Has anyone tried slightly bending their clasp? I think it should work, and I am probably going to try it anyway, but I was just wondering if anyone had tried it and ran into any problems. From what I can see there is enough play in the lengths of all the pieces that putting slightly more bend to it shouldn't affect anything. I am only planning on bending the two stamped thin pieces that are closest to the wrist, not the large top piece.

andy b.
 

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Is it possible to move an extra link from the 6 o'clock side to the 12 side? I've had similar problems and although this sometimes make for a short 6 o'clock side, the clasp moves slightly toward the thumb keeping the hinge of the clasp on the wrist.
 

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Having a somewhat small wrist myself, I agree with John. If you can move a link it is the better solution.

If not, it is possible to bend the inner element of the tri-fold but you will probably wind-up with a non-locking issue. At that point the hinge must be manipulated a little bit to let the buckle cap lock. This can be a bit fussy and frustrating but stick with it.

If all else fails, I'd be happy to make the adjustment for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I already have all of the links out of the 6 o'clock side (that is the first thing I do with new watches). I think I'll give the tweak a try and see how it goes. I've been looking at the clasp from all angles and it doesn't look like it should affect locking as long as I bend it near the hinge, and not in the middle.

If I lived closer to Swedefreak I'd stop by and have him give it a shot.

andy b.
 

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Bending on the blades of a clasp such as this can easily end in frustration and a non-working clasp, as Jonathan mentioned. If you must (and I don't recommend it as I'm not sure the benefits outweigh the risks), try increasing the curvature of both blades when they are shut together, so that their relationship is equally affected. If possible, you might remove the cover from the blades first to do so. I use nylon-jawed pliers for manipulations such as this, metal-jawed will kink and mark the clasp if used bare.

I'd check into the price and availability of a replacement clasp before you do anything so you can know what the worst case scenario holds. I work on clasps everyday, and they can still give me problems from time to time if worn or bent out of whack by the last guy. So good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Noah R.,

I tried giving the clasp a bend and did just as you said, kept the two back pieces together so they had the same bend. All worked well and the watch now matches my wrist better. I think someone might notice the bend if they really looked at it and were very familiar with the standard clasp, but it really isn't noticeable otherwise. It wasn't that much of a bend, just enough.

The Sawtooth is a rather large watch, but the lines of the watch and band flow so nicely on the wrist. It is quickly becoming a favorite of mine. I find myself wearing it more than my trusty 6309-7040. I know, that is a terrible thing to say. :)

andy b.
 
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