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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sushi 6119-7160 Sports divers are rare, so when one was offered cheap, I pounced.



But what seemed from the seller's photo to be a scratch on the crystal, turned out to be a scratched dial!



I've been doing some online research. I came across this piece on striping and re-varnishing dials:

http://watchguy.co.uk/cleaning-and-preserving-original-finish-on-dials/

In addition I've seen before and after examples of Spencer Klein performing miracles of scratch removal on Seiko dials in his videos. And while he never reveals all his secrets, he has hinted at re-varnishing.

I was also wondering if these dial scratches were analogous to fine automotive paint scratches, most of which are in the top clearcoat layer and are removed through fine sanding followed by a refinish of wax or clearcoat.

I have this other blue dial from the same year to practice on.



Helpful ideas would be appreciated.
 

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https://www.instagram.com/p/Bmkqr6XntPs/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

James has had some luck and yes, using automotive type polish. This is really going to depend on your dial type, scratch 'type' and depth etc. But it is possible you may get some improvement.

The chap kindly sent me some, I tried it on a few scratched up pogue dials but too deep to start, ended up polishing off too much, as well you can imagine (they were scrap anyway).

Though I did use it to nicely tidy up an old Rotary dial:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BnUG8WPHnq7/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
 

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https://www.instagram.com/p/Bmkqr6XntPs/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

James has had some luck and yes, using automotive type polish. This is really going to depend on your dial type, scratch 'type' and depth etc. But it is possible you may get some improvement.

The chap kindly sent me some, I tried it on a few scratched up pogue dials but too deep to start, ended up polishing off too much, as well you can imagine (they were scrap anyway).

Though I did use it to nicely tidy up an old Rotary dial:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BnUG8WPHnq7/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
I wonder if the scratch cover waxes used on cars would help hide minor scratches. The ones that are colored wax to match the paint.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
 

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I too was considering automotive wax. It would be less invasive than varnish. My only worry is heat.

On a sunny day it is a greenhouse under the crystal. Would the wax hold up to the heat?
They actually use a wax to repair dials, and automotive wax stands up to being out in the heat. I don't think a watch will get hotter than a car out in the sun. I just got in a 7005 dial that is scratched up, but not gouged. I might try it out, got nothing to lose with this dial, it came on a 6119 movement I wanted.


 

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I too was considering automotive wax. It would be less invasive than varnish. My only worry is heat.

On a sunny day it is a greenhouse under the crystal. Would the wax hold up to the heat?


I highly recommend Flitz Polish. We use it on $200,000 Show Trucks. Their products are far superior to any of your typical off-the-shelf automotive waxes. It is non-toxic, non-abrasive and non-acidic. Polishes chrome, fiberglass, restores plastic, exct. removes scratches in clear coats...it’s fantastic.

If I run into a similar issue such as the one you’re facing...this will be what I reach for first.

https://www.flitz-polish.com/collections/polishes
 

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The below link is to an exhaustive how to guide to repairing scratches in the paint of fine automobiles.

It's writer, Larry Reynolds, is my car care guru, and i have used these instructions to repair scratches on my cars.

I don't know whether this would translate well to the reduced scale of a watch dial, but I offer it up because I thought more info was better.

https://store.carcareonline.com/repairpaintchips.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thank you all for your input.

I decided to go with the auto wax method. On my way home from work I picked up some auto wax and dropped the dial and wax off with a jeweler whose daughter is my student.

I explained to him that this was an experimental procedure, and that I understood the risk. I told him that I expected to either have a restored dial or a ruined one. I wouldn't hold it against him if it ended in disaster, but if I ruined the dial, I could never forgive myself.

Either way, I'll post the results.
 

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You really want polish rather than wax, a stage 2 car polish (quite a light polish that finishes before wax)

Take care though as obviously you’re not working with a lot of clear coat and it can only take out light scratches if they’re not right through the clear coat.
 

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You really want polish rather than wax, a stage 2 car polish (quite a light polish that finishes before wax)

Take care though as obviously you’re not working with a lot of clear coat and it can only take out light scratches if they’re not right through the clear coat.
If they're down through the paint it's gonna be tough to do, but if it's only the clear coat and you can get those voids filled and polished, it should look fine, theoretically anyways. The problem I'm running into is getting a material to stay in the void, polishing keeps taking the wax material back out.
 

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There are other automotive paint restoration products that might be better than either a wax or the "stage two" type of cleaner polish.

The cleaner polish may take off too much of the old paint.. remember the dial here is pretty old and the paint itself isn't anything like the new grades of automotive paint.

Maybe try a glaze product..this would have no wax but is designed to fill scratches in auto paint and has a similar finish to a quality wax.

In either case, if you're filling a scratch, rather than removing it, it won't be a permanent solution...the wax or glaze will only fill the void for so long and then will need treatment again.

Also consider that you will likely change the texture of the dial in the areas you polish and it will look different than the rest of the dial.

Past that, I can't recommend anything that would be safe to use on the dial.

I've touched up dials in the past, but only in an emergency and my results weren't perfect.

I think another challenge with the wax, cleaner, polish or glaze, is that it could be difficult to remove the residue.

Hope it goes well.

Mike
 

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wow that looks really scratched, would it not eb cost effective to just get a replacement crystal or is it because it is not avaialble for that watch
 

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nice job - looks fantastic - another great one for the collection ....
 
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