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This Memorial Day weekend I have been wearing my 7548-700F Stormin Norman, dating to 1981. The watch has several engravings which I find interesting. The first is on the crown side of the case, and is a 9 digit series of numbers. The second is the letters “ATW” on the back. When I saw this when I first bought it, I got very excited. The numbers I deduced to be most likely a social security number. In my mind that made the letters most likely initials. The reason this piqued my interest was that these were commonly sold at PX’s, and because most military members back in the day slapped their SSN’s on pretty much everything. I asked the seller about the watch, but he did not have any information on it’s history.


Fast forward…. I have a friend who was in the 82nd Airborne Division. He actually gave me my first Seiko, which is a 7002 that he picked up at the PX while he was in the service. This was the watch that got me into Seiko’s. I noticed that at the end of his social media posts, he always signs out with the letters ATW. I never really knew what they stood for. Somehow I noticed that those letters and the ones on the back of my watch were the same. I am not sure what made me make that correlation, other than the fact that I was looking at the watch around the same time that I was looking at his posts. So, quick search set me straight….

I don’t know if this watch belonged to an Airborne Ranger, but it would be cool if it did. Maybe someone has some insight on it.
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Very interesting! Nice when they come with history.

I had a similar experience about 12 years ago; I used to collect S&W revolvers and some 1911 pistols. A local dealer gave me an extremely good deal on a nickel S&W 29 .44magnum. To help square things, I pulled a well-worn WWII era "Tanker" pistol holster out of his cabinet and gave him an inflated $50 for it. That night at home, I found a name and a service number on the back. I actually tracked the guy down (he had been on some public utility boards in Colorado and thus on the 'net even though older). We talked and he confirmed it was his and his service number. I asked if he wanted it back and I would mail it to him. He said, "No, no thank you. I wore that as a door gunner on a B-24 over Germany. I don't want to remember anything about that."

Maybe can track down another interesting story...
 

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The 7548 is one of my favorite all time watches. Tough-As-Nails. Thanks for Sharing on this Veteran's Day and wishing all the Veterans to please stay Safe and Healthy. Thank You for your Service!

All American - All the Way!
 

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Thanks guys! The PX Seiko's are the ones that I find the most interesting. They are those "every mans" watches.

Oro I would love to see that holster to go along with the story. As a matter of fact, if anyone has watches or other items with stories to go with them, please feel free to post them here.
 

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I lived at Ft. Bragg 1970-74 as a kid; my father was a Special Forces battalion commander and Commandant of the JFK Special Warfare school there. “All the Way” was, at least at that time, the official motto of the 82nd Airborne Division.

Perhaps today that saying is more widespread amongst airborne or special op’s units, but back then it was an 82nd thing. I still recall the 82nd choir doing the airborne shuffle into our elementary school gym for a performance, while singing the 82nd fight song “Helluva Way to Die,” which is sung to the tune of the Battle Hym of the Republic. It describes in gory detail what happens to an airborne soldier when his chute fails to open.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I lived at Ft. Bragg 1970-74 as a kid; my father was a Special Forces battalion commander and Commandant of the JFK Special Warfare school there. “All the Way” was, at least at that time, the official motto of the 82nd Airborne Division.

Perhaps today that saying is more widespread amongst airborne or special op’s units, but back then it was an 82nd thing. I still recall the 82nd choir doing the airborne shuffle into our elementary school gym for a performance, while singing the 82nd fight song “Helluva Way to Die,” which is sung to the tune of the Battle Hym of the Republic. It describes in gory detail what happens to an airborne soldier when his chute fails to open.
Very interesting. Thank you!


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