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Craftsman
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554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the last year or so, as my quartz watches have developed flat batteries I have not been replacing the battery, but just removing the old one.

On one of my latest checks through the watch boxes I noticed that my King Quartz - 5856-8000 - had stopped. No worries, I'll remove the battery hatch and remove the battery.

I bought this watch a few years ago, and I remember that I gave it only a basic cosmetic cleanup, being really happy that a new battery had brought it back to life.

Looking more carefully at the battery compartment revealed evidence of a previous battery leak that I'd obviously conveniently ignored at the time........

There was evidence (that blue'ish deposit) on various parts of the movement and also the underside of the dial. I decided I needed to take a much closer look.

The more I looked, the worse it got. Rust .....



liquid battery acid .....









I have not serviced one of these before, so it was a journey of discovery (and lots of pictures for future reference).



I cleaned everything meticulously, and set about the rebuild














and the dial side











and time to fit the dial and hands (what a dial!!)



back into the (cleaned) case (what a case, and bracelet!!)



and on the wrist



I'm glad I looked as the battery acid was still liquid in some areas and was continuing to do damage, along with the rust on the upper case surface (under the gasket) and around the crown tube.
 

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Craftsman
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2,035 Posts
Beautiful work Simon. We call this opening up a can of worms. The deeper you dig the more mess is revealed.
 

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Craftsman
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2,035 Posts
Just curious Simon what you use to clean up the battery acid residue on the plates and parts? Rubbing alcohol, naphtha, or something else?
 

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Craftsman
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554 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
cleaning has always been something I have focussed on since I started to restore the rust/battery acid wrecks I bought from ebay.

In this case it was an iterative process of:

1 - manual clean in a bath of Renata - using a cotton bud or sharpened cocktail stick to tease the oils, greases and battery deposit - under high magnification.
2 - manual clean with Rodico and a sharpened cocktail stick - under high magnification.
3 - watch cleaning machine (ElmaSolvex SE) - 2 x cleaning jars, 2 x rinse jars, dry (L&R liquids)
4 - more manual clean with Rodico and a sharpened cocktail stick - under high magnification.
5 - final rinse in Renata and inspection - under high magnification.

As you know, it's very time consuming. I typically spend 2 to 3x the amount of time cleaning as I do rebuilding.
 

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Special Member
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a work of art. beautiful restoration on a good looking watch. (y)
 

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Great work! I've a mind to do mine one of these days, even though there's no sign of leakage.

You mention 5856-8000 in your post, but your pictures show 5856-5000.
 

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Great work and a nice watch, those Seiko quartz movements are really something…


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Administrator
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It just goes to show that even though a vintage watch is working fine or seems to be a service never hurts them as like you show we don't know what lurks below.

I have sent a few 6139s to Simon that needed work but a couple I felt they dident really need to be serviced but for peace of mind I sent them, I was surprised at what he found on stripping them down, we service our cars when they are running ok so why not our watches ?

Nice work Simon (y)
 
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Special Member
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Just awesome work Simon!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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