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Discussion Starter #1
Seeking information and discussion about a family member's Omega Constellation.
ConnieDial.jpg
It is an heirloom and I believe passed down within the family from the original owner. It runs but it stops occasionally so it probably needs a service. It appears to be dirty from wear and unpolished.

The dial appears to have gotten some spotty markings on it, but everything else under the crystal looks good.

ConnieCaseBack.jpg
I think this is what they call a gold-capped model. The case is stainless steel with a gold cap on the front/top and a gold medallion on the caseback. Other than a single horrendous tool mark across the back, it is in good shape. (That wasn't me, by the way - the mark was already there.)

The crown is the 10-sided version but is un-signed - maybe a replacement along the way? I assume the original would have had the Omega emblem on it....
ConnieCaseInside.jpg
The inside of this watch is more beautiful than the outside in my opinion. The attention to detail in a part of the watch that basically never gets seen is pretty amazing. The machine turned finish on the inside of the caseback is nice. What does the marking "14393 61 SC" refer to?
ConnieMvt1.jpg
Wow. Pretty movement. What is that metal?
ConnieMvt2.jpg
Other than some fingerprints/smudges, it looks very nice inside to me.
The serial number dates this one to 1961, I think.


Assuming that it needs to be disassembled, cleaned, oiled, and reassembled, is that something that a relatively new DIYer should consider with this movement? I guess I'm asking if there are any special considerations with this movement when compared to a Seiko automatic movement. Anyone know of a link to a step by step service on these?
 

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Nice looking Omega!! I don't know a ton about these watches, but remember reading in this article a while back that the original crown (which yours appears to have), an unpolished case/caseback, and the "pie-pan" dial (which yours has) are all pretty desirable. This article may be a good source of info, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
"...remember reading in this article a while back that the original crown (which yours appears to have)..."


Thanks for the link! That explains the crown. It is probably original, as you say, but the gold plate is worn off which also means the Omega emblem is gone.... But, as the article says, original in worn condition is better then not original.


I'd like to hear from anyone that has owned these or serviced them about any concerns with servicing them...
 

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The movement is a caliber 551, 24 jewel, chronometer grade. One of the great Swiss movements, IMO. The metal is rose gold ... pretty amazing finish considering that nobody would see it except during service. As twall points out, those crowns wear down pretty easily, which is why it’s (now) unsigned. The “pie-pan” dial is iconic; I have a similar watch from 1962. I’m sure that step-by-step service instructions exist someplace; my greatest concern would be that it’s a 60-year-old movement for which parts are difficult to come by.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
"...my greatest concern would be that it’s a 60-year-old movement for which parts are difficult to come by..."



Very good point. With the Seiko movements that I've been working on, if a part goes pinging away, I can probably find a replacement. Not as likely with this one.


This article: https://www.thenakedwatchmaker.com/omega is full of movement eye-candy. It's a really beautifully designed movement. But it does look very specifically different than Seiko movements... It will probably be a good idea for me to pay someone to service this one - someone that has worked on these models before.
 

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Yes, I'd recommend having someone with some experience (and possibly a parts movement or two in the bottom drawer) service it. You don't want to be learning on a watch for which parts are scarce.
I have an Omega 354 bumper automatic that should be serviced and shouldn't be much more complex that some of the simple hand winders that I've done, but the parts issue and lack of familiarity is holding me back.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The watch is original, the movement is made of brass, it has micro adjustments, the so-called swan neck.
There are many parts on the aftermarket.
To say 100% about the watch you need better pictures, serial numbers inside and on movement.
Often folders from various models hit the market (original components)
It's a Gold cap, and the medallion is not gold but brass
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for the input and I'll check out the Omega blog for sure.


Do any of you recommend a particular person or persons for servicing one of these? Maybe even a forum member who also works on these models?
 

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Everything you ever wanted to know about vintage Constellations: http://omega-constellation-collectors.blogspot.com/

I'm fortunate enough to have a gold Connie from 1952 - the first year of production and my birth year. It has the "bumper" style automatic and it's a slightly strange feeling when the rotor comes up against the springs.
It is automatic fender winding, usually produced models for the US market
 

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> It is automatic fender winding, usually produced models for the US market

Yes, called a "bumper" rotor, it oscillates around a part circle with a spring at either end of the oscillation. Calibre 352 and 354 if I remember correctly.
 
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