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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had this thread posted on the Wrist Sushi forum- however I'd like to share it with a wider audience in case there are any new suggestions or this will help others suffering similar issues.
The G757-5020 is one of my prized watches and I'm dismayed to find it in its current state.
I went to wear it the other day and was dismayed to find it looked like this.
It's been 2yrs since battery replacement.


I opened it up and put a temporary battery in (wrong height) to ensure it was fine- as a saw a tiny bit of corrosion near the battery.
That's when I had my first glimpse of pending doom.
Light but no LCD!
So I ordered the right battery and figured there may be a contact issue caused by the green goblin!

So this morning the battery arrived and I opened it up.
First battery cover then top down.



Cleaned it with a lens cleaner. I figured it's alcohol based and lint free.
Green goblin lifted from multiple points on contacts and circuit board and LCD contacts.

Popped it back together,armed it with the right battery and flipped it over.


What starts with F and rhymes with truck.

Well you get the picture.
I'll use some more alcohol ;( and give it another shot tonight. But from my experience, looks like I'm hunting another module.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Update 1- I've wiped the contacts and the LCD strip contacts with isopropyl. My only suspicion at the moment. is the gaps in the contact plate where the battery contact arms meet. I've circled it. The other circle with green muck is sorted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Update-2 I get brief moments of joy and then it flakes out on me.

Literally seconds before it was absolutely perfect.
Bang head. And now seconds later it's working perfectly. This time I shifted the contact of the battery slightly to land 1/2 millimeters differently on the circuit board. We will see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Update 3 it's been a fortnight now and it runs for 12 or so hours then flakes out for 12 or so hours. These numbers are just guesstimations
But you get the picture.
If you have any suggestions I will gladly like to hear from you.
Cam.
 

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My experience is that when those symptoms occur, then the problem will only re-occur. I have had to change the circuit board to remedy the problem. As you said, a new module is probably the ultimate solution. Hope I'm wrong!
 

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Update 3 it's been a fortnight now and it runs for 12 or so hours then flakes out for 12 or so hours. These numbers are just guesstimations
But you get the picture.
If you have any suggestions I will gladly like to hear from you.
Cam.
"a fortnight"

My internal reading voice has an American accent. Usually I read along, oblivious to if the writer is from New York or York. Occasionally however.... :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
"a fortnight"



My internal reading voice has an American accent. Usually I read along, oblivious to if the writer is from New York or York. Occasionally however.... :p


Is fortnight not a northern hemisphere word? I don't follow? In Australia it means two weeks and it's a very important term as many of us are paid "fortnightly"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My experience is that when those symptoms occur, then the problem will only re-occur. I have had to change the circuit board to remedy the problem. As you said, a new module is probably the ultimate solution. Hope I'm wrong!


I'm fearing that. The only thing I haven't tried yet is I've noticed some of the circuitry failing at the battery contact point. I may be able to bridge it with some kind of conductive material and see if it's a power issue. Otherwise it's some kind of short that I cannot see.
 

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Is fortnight not a northern hemisphere word? I don't follow? In Australia it means two weeks and it's a very important term as many of us are paid "fortnightly"
We say bi-weekly in the US and I think Canada as well.

We in the US have a tendency to be easily charmed by such non-American terms that occur in our mostly common language.

Not really confusing, just interesting. :)
 

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Tall battery

I am ABSOLUTELY not in any way proficient in digital watch mechanics but can share that i found an NOS digital Seiko and someone had put in the wrong size battery (too tall) It seems to have crushed the circuits, in addition to the corrosion problem.

Not sure if that has anything to do with it but you never know....
 

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Yeah, I think that term is very much BE. :grin:
Here in Germany we get paid monthly, so there is no special term for two weeks...
Might not be limited to Queen Victoria's empire, Mr. Jones. My country (Philippines) was an American colony but the use of the term fortnight (mostly to describe the manner you are paid) is quite common here as well...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Fortnight- "fēowertyne niht" Old English meaning 14 nights. I think it is also a reference point to half a sydonic lunar cycle.
It's funny when you post something that you think is universal.
 

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Update 3 it's been a fortnight now and it runs for 12 or so hours then flakes out for 12 or so hours. These numbers are just guesstimations
But you get the picture.
If you have any suggestions I will gladly like to hear from you.
Cam.
Is the 12 hours on and off consistent? Just throwing out ideas, but it may be getting hot and shutting down? That is, if it's a circuit line issue it wouldn't run for hours and then shut down for hours. I have a chronograph coming in the mail and it may be in similar condition - so looking at the works has been helpful.
 
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