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Discussion Starter #1
I acquired a 62mas the other day as I needed a dial for a renovation job. When the watch arrived I opened the case back to be greeted with this.



Hmm, not a good start! Off with the rotor and this was revealed



I had a feeling removing the dial could be tricky! I soaked the dial retaining feet and screws in penetrating oil for about 24 hours the tried breaking the locked screws by tightening slightly then slackening. With the first one it worked a treat and the screw undid, but the second one was jammed tight. I gave it another 24hours with some more penetrating oil and gave it another go but the inevitable happened and the screw sheared. I could have drilled out the screw but I've tried this method before and it invariably makes a mess of the plate so I decided to cut the foot off and solder a new one on. This is the first vintage dial I've tried this method on, however I have done a few AM 6309 dials and SKX's.

This was the dial removed where I'd cut the foot



A shot from above showing where I'd dressed the stump flat



Onto the machine and give it a blast of current



It's on there nicely and it appears to be a strong joint. It's a fine balance because the hotter you get the joint the stronger it is but at the same time you don't want to put to much heat into the dial!



No discolouration on the dial side so all's good



It takes a little fettling of the feet to align the dial centrally but in it goes



And both feet gripped, I'm very pleased with how this turned out, my pet hate is having to use dial dots!



The dial and handset just need to be relumed now to allow me to finish the job. :)
 

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Wow I'd take my hat off to you if I wore one. That was one gummed up watch. What causes that?
 

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great work...
 

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I would imagine the case leaked and the movement got wet, instead of removing the case back to dry it out it just got left. Not a pretty sight!
Strange though you'd expect it would rust more. Has sort of a old lacquer look too it. I've dealt with old clock movements that look like they were stored under the thames for the past 100 years but they just rust and pit and disintegrate. I guess the japs coat the movements when new with lacquer? I wonder if it's condensation from being left in sunlight behind a window? Guess we will never know but super job restoring it.
 

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They don't like water thats for sure has mine shows but the dial side was pretty good.
Right ok I can see from your rather dodgy movement whats going on now. Did that thing ever tick again?

I asked about this a couple of years ago and was told it was the nickle plating reacting to acids. Still have not figured out how to link to old posts but title was "Eww What causes this"
Thanks! It was the bubbling on the rotor that had me scratching my head. What ever it's a good advert for making sure all your watch seals and gaskets are all intact and doing their job!
 

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Right ok I can see from your rather dodgy movement whats going on now. Did that thing ever tick again?



Thanks! It was the bubbling on the rotor that had me scratching my head. What ever it's a good advert for making sure all your watch seals and gaskets are all intact and doing their job!
No that one was well and truly dead but i did get a few movement spares from the dial side :)
 

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Mark Lovic cleans up a Breitling on his youtube "Watch Repair Channel"...He does a real good job . It was interesting to see how he used baking soda to clean up the parts.
 

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Baking Soda is a good product to use

It extracts a lot of well known acids of many kind. If you just
leave what you are working on buried in it for a while it can do
wonders for doing things. Baking Soda is a good polishing
agent dabbed with water and used gently to buff and polish
many things. I use it to dry a lot of race car parts a lot
because it absorbs the moisture and many types of residue's.
If tried to be used it can do a lot of things not known by many.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Wow great job of rescuing that dial, what's going to happen to the early small crown case?
It's actually a later (6217-8001) large crown case, if you look where the crown meets the case you can see a slight scallop where the case has been machined to accept the flange of the crown tube. The early (6217-8000) ones don't have this feature as the early tubes aren't flanged.

The case will be re-used once I've rescued the movement. :)
 

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Nice work and a delicate touch. I'd have been very nervous soldering the dial. It is surprising that the dial doesn't show more damage......

How did the hands look, curious?
 
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