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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

I am relatively new here and haven't posted too much, although I follow almost everything and educate myself with your expertise and knowledge with so much excitement!!
I grew up with Seikos mainly, my father loved them, and here are two of his watches that I really love. They are pretty beat up as he wore them everywhere :)
From the many recourses around here and online, I understand that Proof Pogues come with a notch case. My father's is a Proof from July of 1970, with 6139A movement, and it has no notch case. I am pretty sure he has bought both of them, as the majority of his watches, new back then but unfortunately we have lost them 22 years now and never had the chance to sit and talk watches with him.. And how much I would love to do that!!!
Now, is there a possibility this was originally sold like this or sometime in its life he changed the case in a service?
The watch is quite beat up, the crystal is so scratched, but everything work perfectly, although it definitely needs a service as, for sure, it has 22 years to do one :rolleyes: Also, as you all see, the case has a hit in one corner, so my second question is, would you try to locate another case to replace it or send it to one reputable case restorer and have it fixed? Other than that, the lines are so sharp of that case, I feel so bad about that ding!!
Thank you all for reading so far!!
And a few pictures





 

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Strange times for Seiko in the latter end of 1969 and during 1970 with the change over from proof to resist/resistant so I would say your case is correct but obviously i'm no expert.

I would keep the case as is and not restore it but I would have them serviced, nice heirlooms.
 

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Strange times for Seiko in the latter end of 1969 and during 1970 with the change over from proof to resist/resistant so I would say your case is correct but obviously i'm no expert.

I would keep the case as is and not restore it but I would have them serviced, nice heirlooms.
I agree John, I reckon it’s right as it is. This watch is right on the transition period from proof to resist. I’ve got one the other way around... notch case, resist dial, 1 piece Chrono hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Strange times for Seiko in the latter end of 1969 and during 1970 with the change over from proof to resist/resistant so I would say your case is correct but obviously i'm no expert.

I would keep the case as is and not restore it but I would have them serviced, nice heirlooms.


Yes this is on my mind too as in real life it doesn't look too bad. In the pictures it looks awful!!

Thank you for your answers, I really appreciate it 🥰
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The 5719 one button Chrono looks very nice too... ‘Never easy to find with a black dial!

Thank you, I love this watch!! The bezel is so worn from use and I can't find nowhere an original one to replace it :(
 

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Just to chime in a bit late, but yes, that one looks correct to me. For Pogues, the transition between "proof" and "resist" came in mid-1970 and the transitional models that I've seen are all 6139-6001. It's almost like they were using whichever parts were at hand, but the transitional models I've seen usually have a "proof" dial, a "resist" caseback, and a no-notch case. Sweep hands seem to vary and can be either one- or two-piece. The transitional models I've seen are usually dated June or July 1970.

The models before that -- like yours -- are proof/proof and have a two-piece sweep hand. The ones afterward are resist/resist and have a one-piece sweep hand.
 

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Hi, I have also proof/proof Pogue from July 1970 with non notched case. Those are transitional Pogues, I also think that July 1970 is the last month of production of proof Pogue. Here is mine...


Sent from my CLT-L29 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi, I have also proof/proof Pogue from July 1970 with non notched case. Those are transitional Pogues, I also think that July 1970 is the last month of production of proof Pogue. Here is mine...


Sent from my CLT-L29 using Tapatalk

Thank you, what a wonderful condition yours is!! So nice to see another one :)
I will keep it like it is, I've made up my mind, since the case is correct. Do a much needed service, wait for a new crystal as soon @SeikoPsycho2 is ready and maybe source an original and in good condition bezel insert.
I appreciate all the comments everyone 🥰
 

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Just to chime in a bit late, but yes, that one looks correct to me. For Pogues, the transition between "proof" and "resist" came in mid-1970 and the transitional models that I've seen are all 6139-6001. It's almost like they were using whichever parts were at hand, but the transitional models I've seen usually have a "proof" dial, a "resist" caseback, and a no-notch case. Sweep hands seem to vary and can be either one- or two-piece. The transitional models I've seen are usually dated June or July 1970.

The models before that -- like yours -- are proof/proof and have a two-piece sweep hand. The ones afterward are resist/resist and have a one-piece sweep hand.
Fully agreed, noting that a 1-piece sweep hand could easily be a service replacement hand so not having the 2-pc hand is never a sign of unoriginality when all the other peices add up to original.
 

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Those gold proofs here are beauties.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Fully agreed, noting that a 1-piece sweep hand could easily be a service replacement hand so not having the 2-pc hand is never a sign of unoriginality when all the other peices add up to original.
Good point. These watches were worn daily, and often repaired to preserve function, not authenticity. IIRC, the ultimate collector watch — Pogue’s own 6139-6005 — had a non-original sub-dial hand. “Originality” only became important when these watches were already a few decades old and had lived long, useful lives.
 
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