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Discussion Starter #1
Just got this today, it's swimming inside wet as a wet thing, and it's spent 2 weeks getting to me through the international postal system


Screwed the back on again and leaving it for now, still got my other two projects to complete before this one gets started
 

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You will need to psych yourself up for this one:93:

The crown looks small, did the water get in through the crown tube?
 

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That is a Doozie of a Project

But that one Not Impossible ........ .
When you can take the inner's out and soak it good. I had one like
that last year, did it and it ticks today.
That is not impossible for you from what we have been seeing, Transporter.
I bet that Dial can be saved also.
Go for it ......:72:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The crown is way too small, the movement is a 7002 so no problems getting any spares, I've just got to get my 6105 sorted and my other 7002 daily beater that I'm in the process of modding, when they are done and the watches I've got from other people for repair are finished, then I'll look at this one, I reckon a nice aged leather nato strap would suite to start off with
 

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Looks as though that 7002 7010 has the hard to find Japan 7002 movement in it. well hard for me to find anyway.

Nice catch.

Dont put the back on and leave it, it will only get worse, remove the movement, take off the hands and dial and date ring, remove the balance assy then immerse the movement in a mug of strong tea for 24 hours (no milk or sugar and cold) Then strip the movement, clean and dry it, then store it until your ready to work on it.
7009 parts are interchangeable with the 7002 and some 70xx parts will as well. If your stuck for movement parts drop me a PM.
 

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How I love project watches like yours ...
I have the same 7002, also received as project watch but I've decided only to service the movement. So I have now a Seiko for "hard works" and use it if I'm renovating the house of my girlfriend or working in the garden - so I am always accompanied with a perefect working Seiko and there is no need to pay attention for any possible scratchings :cheer:
Regards, Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cheers guys, ivor brilliant tip there, I will now, well tomorrow take the back back off and soak in tea and do as im told, pete thats my idea as well to have two, one this one is my daily beater, my other 7002 is being modded to make it a super ocean abys homage
 

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Oh how I like a dirty girl but boy have you got your work cutout with that one! I get clocks like that when they have been left in attics for 150+ years and the tea trick works.... although I have to buy industrial sized boxes of tea for the clock movements :)
 

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hi
what does soaking it in tea actually do for the movement ?
 

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hi
what does soaking it in tea actually do for the movement ?
It makes it feel at home :D


It's an organic rust and crap remover ;) It is certainly better than soaking in WD40 which a lot of folk do with their clocks. WD40 being for dispersing water not a magic anti seize fluid. Tea is very 'kind' to the metal even though it tastes like shizenhowzer!
 

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I think soaking in Coke (drink) makes more sense.
They gives stainless steel a shine !
Tea is a old method which personally I'd prefer. I tried Coke year ago on stuck pistons in barrels and it never worked where as tea did every time :)
 

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hi
what does soaking it in tea actually do for the movement ?
Tea contains Tannic acid. Drop a ruted watch part into a small dish of tea and leave it for a couple of hours, youll start seeing particles of rust drifting along the bottom of the dish.

Pinched from Wiki

Tannic acid is used in the conservation of ferrous (iron based) metal objects to passivate and inhibit corrosion. Tannic acid reacts with the corrosion products to form a more stable compound, thus preventing further corrosion from taking place. After treatment the tannic acid residue is generally left on the object so that if moisture reaches the surface the tannic acid will be rehydrated and prevent or slow any corrosion. Tannic acid treatment for conservation is very effective and widely used but it does have a significant visual effect on the object, turning the corrosion products black and any exposed metal dark blue. It should also be used with care on objects with copper alloy components as the tannic acid can have a slight etching effect on these metals.
 
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