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Has anyone who's ordered this book received any updates on when it will be shipped?
I emailed Ryugo to inquire about it but have not received a reply.
 

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My quote plus shipping came back at $129 - ouch.

I really wanted to have this book since Speed-Timers are by far my favorite watch, but not at that cost.

Looking forward to hearing everyone's comments on the books when they arrive.
Precisely where I landed. I don't even have a bookshelf anymore. Or album collection.
 

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His Instagram post indicated that the books will start shipping on the 20th.

Double Darn It! I was hoping to have it in time for the holidays to read along with my newly acquired "Seiko A Journey In Time" book.


Thanks for the info!
 

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^^^^ I agree but I’m willing to grin and bear the wait.


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Greetings from Down Under !!



I've been in correspondence with the author who has quoted approx AUD$200 to have this book shipped to Brisbane.


Tad expensive for a soft-cover, in my opinion.


Has anybody received their copy and what are your thoughts on the value-for-money component of this publication?


Thanks,


Russ.
 

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Hey Seiko folks with the book (I’m still waiting for mine...). Does it list the last month of production for the 6138? I believe that it is March of 1979. Thanks!


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Still waiting on mine as well. I just paid for parcel post, which says 1-3 months. ;) Literally on the slow boat, I guess. Tracking just shows it left Japan. Oh well, it will be a nice surprise when it arrives.
 

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Still waiting on mine as well. I just paid for parcel post, which says 1-3 months. ;) Literally on the slow boat, I guess. Tracking just shows it left Japan. Oh well, it will be a nice surprise when it arrives.


I did the same thinking that it couldn’t really be that slow. My tracking shows the same. Man I wish I spent the extra funds to get it here sooner. Now it might be a March birthday present.


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I just got a copy on loan and must say I am rather ambivalent. Of course it was a good read and any of us who pick it up will be happy we did so, but it's not without some fair criticism.

Plus side - compelling story telling of the development of all sorts of 1960s chronos, and the "proof" of Seiko 6139 being the world's first automatic chronograph. So happy Ryugo-san interviewed the designers while they are still alive and well and able to recount these significant chapters in Seiko history and horology overall. That is by far the book's major accomplishment. Congratulations for documenting all of this fascinating material.

It sure had some great photos. Covers the earliest chrome-rimmed crystals on the 6139-6000 and the 6139-603X in French and Italian dress. Great info on Seiko moving first itself, and then bringing the industry, out of using Ligne measurements into mm to improve precision. Great info on dial texture finishing technique options Seiko used in it's design heyday. Loads more good stuff. Like I said, lots to enjoy.

Minus side? Frankly it seems rushed. As one example not sure he got the 6139-6002 Teal Sunrise summary info right. He glosses over the limited production months (he says 'about 3' months - which 3? 2N & 2D we know for sure so might be the other?) or even why it is nicknamed "Sunrise". Yet I learned why some have orange seconds hands and others yellow. I see more than a few overlooked opportunities to have added value with fine points that were just flat-out missed chances to educate. This reduces the value of the volume as a reference tool.

I think the author could have passed the manuscript around to more people to gather more perspective and knowledge. It is common to ask for peer review especially on specific chapters with acknowleged subject matter experts to broaden the base and get better content. I wish he had done that on every model he covers.

Frankly at this price point it relies too heavily on becoming a repository for catalog cuts and vintage advertisements (you will also see many of the ones you know well not shown, too). All these catalog cuts just seem like 'filler material.' We are talking roughly 120 out of the 200 pages. It's not that the reader doesn't enjoy thumbing through them but it's already out there on the web in numerous places so it leaves me feeling like the book used them mostly just to get fattened up.

All in all with so many nice photos to drool over, good stories, Eric, Bertrand and Anthony's contributed photos - no one will be sorry they bought it. I also don't think anyone will be sorry they didn't pay the publishers release price. I am thankful to my kind friend who loaned me the book knowing I had passed on the purchase but had interest in seeing it. I am comfortable not owning it as much as most owners will be comfortable to have purchased it. It's that kind of a value proposition.

That's my review in a nutshell and I'm sticking to it. Please feel free to take issue with anything I posted. I do not mean to discredit the fine effort by the author to whom I send my thanks for his considerable time and energy putting this together.
 

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I just got a copy on loan and must say I am rather ambivalent. Of course it was a good read and any of us who pick it up will be happy we did so, but it's not without some fair criticism.

Plus side - compelling story telling of the development of all sorts of 1960s chronos, and the "proof" of Seiko 6139 being the world's first automatic chronograph. So happy Ryugo-san interviewed the designers while they are still alive and well and able to recount these significant chapters in Seiko history and horology overall. That is by far the book's major accomplishment. Congratulations for documenting all of this fascinating material.

It sure had some great photos. Covers the earliest chrome-rimmed crystals on the 6139-6000 and the 6139-603X in French and Italian dress. Great info on Seiko moving first itself, and then bringing the industry, out of using Ligne measurements into mm to improve precision. Great info on dial texture finishing technique options Seiko used in it's design heyday. Loads more good stuff. Like I said, lots to enjoy.

Minus side? Frankly it seems rushed. As one example not sure he got the 6139-6002 Teal Sunrise summary info right. He glosses over the limited production months (he says 'about 3' months - which 3? 2N & 2D we know for sure so might be the other?) or even why it is nicknamed "Sunrise". Yet I learned why some have orange seconds hands and others yellow. I see more than a few overlooked opportunities to have added value with fine points that were just flat-out missed chances to educate. This reduces the value of the volume as a reference tool.

I think the author could have passed the manuscript around to more people to gather more perspective and knowledge. It is common to ask for peer review especially on specific chapters with acknowleged subject matter experts to broaden the base and get better content. I wish he had done that on every model he covers.

Frankly at this price point it relies too heavily on becoming a repository for catalog cuts and vintage advertisements (you will also see many of the ones you know well not shown, too). All these catalog cuts just seem like 'filler material.' We are talking roughly 120 out of the 200 pages. It's not that the reader doesn't enjoy thumbing through them but it's already out there on the web in numerous places so it leaves me feeling like the book used them mostly just to get fattened up.

All in all with so many nice photos to drool over, good stories, Eric, Bertrand and Anthony's contributed photos - no one will be sorry they bought it. I also don't think anyone will be sorry they didn't pay the publishers release price. I am thankful to my kind friend who loaned me the book knowing I had passed on the purchase but had interest in seeing it. I am comfortable not owning it as much as most owners will be comfortable to have purchased it. It's that kind of a value proposition.

That's my review in a nutshell and I'm sticking to it. Please feel free to take issue with anything I posted. I do not mean to discredit the fine effort by the author to whom I send my thanks for his considerable time and energy putting this together.

I have to agree with you. I bought it with express shipping. While I’m not belittling Ryugo-San’s effort in getting the book out, at over USD100 a piece, I wish it had been less old adverts and more new material.


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Hi. Kinda late to this thread. I'm a 16-year old Seiko Collector from Hong Kong. I'm also looking for Mr. Ryugo's masterpiece but I've tried emailing him and it shows an error pictured below. So i try messaging his Instagram and that too shows me an error pictured below. Please someone from here help me out in trying to acquire this beautiful book. Or at least help me in contacting Mr. Ryugo.

Also i would like to acquire the 2003 book A remarkable story of seiko. I've tried everywhere but none for sale. But that can wait as I've probably only got enough funds(16 y/o) for Mr. Ryugo's book right now. Thank you so much,for your help guys!


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