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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,

I've had this Early Seikosha Imperial Japan Military Sakura watch for quite a while. The Cherry Blossom (Air Force) insignia is Very Rare and I would like to get the watch working properly. I had it running at one point but the hand winding mechanism seemed to quit on me and I can't get it sorted. My normal watchmaker can normally fix almost every Seiko I bring to him as long as I supply the needed parts. He also could not get it fixed. We just don't know enough about this movement nor do I have the parts or a donor watch needed to get it sorted.

I would like to send the Seikosha Watch to a watchmaker to get it fixed and running. Any recommendations on a watchmaker experienced with these older Seikos would be greatly appreciated. Many Thanks in Advance!

Kyle







Movement Photo

 

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Well especially in your part of the world, nobody can be better at all things Seiko repair than Adrian at Vintage Time Australia (VTA). He specializes in getting the off the beaten track calibers working again inlcuding those nutty old ELs, cheap '80s quartzes, and any mechanical you can throw at him.

He did my early 1969 Pogue and repolished the rare CRC (chrome rimmed crystal) and relumed the hands and dial to a crazy level of perfection - proper shade in daylight, weak (on purpose!) proper green lume at night. Superb time keeping, no positional variance, and spot on perfect zero reset on both hands. Just perfect in every regard.

He also rebuilt my heavily water damaged 6105B movement and again made my 6105-8110 diver run like new. The guy does amazing work.

 

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Hi Guys,

I've had this Early Seikosha Imperial Japan Military Sakura watch for quite a while. The Cherry Blossom (Air Force) insignia is Very Rare and I would like to get the watch working properly. I had it running at one point but the hand winding mechanism seemed to quit on me and I can't get it sorted. My normal watchmaker can normally fix almost every Seiko I bring to him as long as I supply the needed parts. He also could not get it fixed. We just don't know enough about this movement nor do I have the parts or a donor watch needed to get it sorted.

I would like to send the Seikosha Watch to a watchmaker to get it fixed and running. Any recommendations on a watchmaker experienced with these older Seikos would be greatly appreciated. Many Thanks in Advance!

Kyle







Movement Photo

As suggested, Adrian is one of the best for these old watches.
You might also consider Spencer Klein.
Both gentlemen have extensive experience and a long client list of satisfied customers.
Both likely have long wait times but then you can't do awesome work instantly.
Personally, I wouldn't hesitate to use either of these watch mechanics no matter what the wait time,
 

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Very cool watch, I wonder, the movements were bought from Moeris (or manufactured under licence?) Would Moeris parts fit?
 

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It is my understanding that they were produced under licence from Moeris. It is possible that Moeris parts would fit, but the tolerances on these early movements are quite variable so it is generally recommended to swap a movement in total instead of individual parts if you can, as it can be very difficult to get a movement to run accurately.

That type 8 movement is actually quite common and it should not be too hard to find a replacement pretty easily. Just look for an early running example on YJ and check the shape of the plates in the movement photos to match.

I had an issue with a broken pallet fork on my Navy model and had to pick up a donor movement. From memory I paid under $30 for another model with a trashed case, these come up quite regularly as the plated cases do not hold up well and usually sell cheaply when in poor cosmetic condition.

This movement was used in large numbers of watches, and as these "military" watches were essentially just standard models with the dials marked with logos for sale at the PX, finding a replacement should be pretty easy. Just keep an eye out for auctions of early sub second models with movement shots. When you get a replacement movement it will almost certainly require a service, I would also happily recommend Adrian to clean the movement and get it up and running again.
 

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Great historic piece Kyle, it actually looks tiny but of course they were in those days.
Most of Seikos earlier output were licensed Swiss movements.
Hope you get it fixed
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Many Thanks for all the replies and excellent suggestions :)

During the first attempt at a Fix I bought a Seikosha Watch to use the movement as a donor for parts (movement looked identical to my eye) but my watchmaker found out and just as Anthony stated there were slight variances in the parts and plates. My watchmaker tried and spent a long time but he could not get the parts of the donor to fit the original movement. We did not want to use the complete donor in the watch because the original has the Beautifully scripted SEIKOSHA with a wonderful font - sometimes it's the very small things that make collecting Seiko's so much fun - (wink wink to the Tiger) ;);)

Perhaps I need to find the exact movement (marked SEIKOSHA) and as Anthony has suggested just do a total drop in swap? If anyone can find a suitable donor movement I would be Extremely Grateful. Thank You!

Kyle

Here is the 1st Donor and Failed Fix Attempt



 
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