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Thanks for part II. I've been thinking abouth this piece for the past couple of weeks. It would be great to know what the intended application was.
 

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An interesting piece. The beat rate is easily calculated from (20 beats per second) = 20 x 60 x 60 = 72,000 bph. A rate this high requires special materials, oils and ways of overcoming stresses not found in lower beat movements, which may account for the unusual routing of the hairspring where it attaches to the stud carrier. (Unless it's been assembled incorrectly, which may be why it's not running.)

I doubt the stopwatch's intended use is for equestrian polo, as someone mentioned previously. True, each chukka lasts a maximum of 7.5 minutes, but the clock is stopped every time the umpire blows his whistle. Since your is a single-button stopwatch I'm guessing it resets to zero after being stopped, thus rendering it unable to cumulatively time a chukka. The same goes for water polo.

The fact it records time to 0.05 sec indicates it's intended more for timing single competitive events such as an athletics or horse race, which can be decided by such a small amount. It could certainly be used for horse training, so that's what I'm putting my money on.

Oh, and that engine-turned finish is called perlage, not perlee! :)
 

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gary6213 said:
Thanks for part II. I've been thinking abouth this piece for the past couple of weeks. It would be great to know what the intended application was.

Thanks, Gary. As for application, I'm still researching the uses of the Heuer timers in those days, and I'm guessing whatever those were used for, mine was Seikosha's alternative. Also thinking that this particular stopwatch may have been only available in Japan, and that might narrow down the application. I know that, in the West, we see a stopwatch and tend to associate it with sports (and we can therefore invest in expensive gear, because there's money to be made there), but early 20th Century Japan may have been a different place altogether. :) ...I'm still reading up on it.
 

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Sir said:
An interesting piece. The beat rate is easily calculated from (20 beats per second) = 20 x 60 x 60 = 72,000 bph. A rate this high requires special materials, oils and ways of overcoming stresses not found in lower beat movements, which may account for the unusual routing of the hairspring where it attaches to the stud carrier. (Unless it's been assembled incorrectly, which may be why it's not running.)
Thank you, Sir Les. That's very useful to know, as I do not know much about the positioning of the hairspring. I'll try and find more information on oiling and material. The colour of the ratchet and crown wheels, as well as the screws, is quite peculiar and looks bluish gun-metal (whereas anodized would look grayish gun-metal). At the moment, it doesn't wind, but I'll certainly have my watchmaker to look at it, as I certainly don't want to break anything. :D

72,000 is what I worked it out to be as well, but wondering how Heuer achieved 0.01 resolution at only 180,000 bph, when 360,000 bph should have been needed. Unless my source is incorrect--will double check on this.



Sir said:
Oh, and that engine-turned finish is called perlage, not perlee! :)
Oops... you are right. I was looking at through references in French :D ...it is indeed perlage in English... thank you :)
 
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