The Watch Site banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ever since I became obsessed and started collecting vintage Seiko's a little under a year ago I have progressively been interested in doing a complete service. I have done a bunch of small repairs during this time and consequently collected a smattering of crappy tools. Armed with these, some Moebius oils and a lot of info gleaned from this site and the internet I decided to take the plunge. Actually I had even less at my disposal because I'm working in Australia for the next 3 months and so only took a limited 'kit' with me.

The unsuspecting victim was a sad 6119-6023 I picked up on the bay

IMG_6787.jpg

Running but looked like it had been dunked in a can of oil....oil absolutely everywhere including the dial. So I completely disassembled her including all the parts that novices are warned never to touch; mainspring, balance, jewels and canon pinion. I ignored the warnings because 1. there was so much oil everywhere and 2. this was a learning experience for me and wanted to get the most out of it.

IMG_6800.jpg

IMG_6811.jpg

IMG_6808.jpg

I thoroughly cleaned everything with Shellite except the mainspring which I carefully wiped with watch paper and the pallet with rodico. And armed with the service manual from this site I slowly reassembled heeding the advice that 'less is more' when it comes to oil. When I got to the balance I noticed 2 coils stuck together so I gave it another quick dunk in the shellite which seemed to do the trick. Until the watch fired up and they got stuck together again. At this point I'm thinking it's magnetized but being away from home I didn't have my demagnetizer so I gave the balance a more thorough bath this time pulling out the jewel. Problem solved.

Cleaned mainspring....that was fun trying to get back in it's home!

IMG_6814.jpg

Back together and chuffing away

IMG_6819.jpg

The dial however was not in great shape. I guess the oil had softened the lacquer which I inadvertently scrapped away near the hole :mad: If anyone has one spare they'd be willing to give up I sure would be grateful ;)

IMG_6824.jpg

Amazingly the watch runs +7s/24hr on the wrist without any adjustments. But I won't be able to assess the health of the movement until I return home to my timegrapher.

I'm sure many of my watchmaking techniques were ham fisted and would make a watchmaker cringe but it really was a very satisfying experience to take it through completion and I couldn't have done it without all the excellent info and advice on this site. The one thing I did have a question about though was the dia-fix jewel. The manual said to oil it assembled but my extra fine oiler was too big for the hole so I oiled it prior to assembly like the dia-shock jewel. Was this a mistake?

photo.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Ever since I became obsessed and started collecting vintage Seiko's a little under a year ago I have progressively been interested in doing a complete service. I have done a bunch of small repairs during this time and consequently collected a smattering of crappy tools. Armed with these, some Moebius oils and a lot of info gleaned from this site and the internet I decided to take the plunge. Actually I had even less at my disposal because I'm working in Australia for the next 3 months and so only took a limited 'kit' with me.

The unsuspecting victim was a sad 6119-6023 I picked up on the bay

View attachment 102977

Running but looked like it had been dunked in a can of oil....oil absolutely everywhere including the dial. So I completely disassembled her including all the parts that novices are warned never to touch; mainspring, balance, jewels and canon pinion. I ignored the warnings because 1. there was so much oil everywhere and 2. this was a learning experience for me and wanted to get the most out of it.

View attachment 102985

View attachment 102993

View attachment 103001

I thoroughly cleaned everything with Shellite except the mainspring which I carefully wiped with watch paper and the pallet with rodico. And armed with the service manual from this site I slowly reassembled heeding the advice that 'less is more' when it comes to oil. When I got to the balance I noticed 2 coils stuck together so I gave it another quick dunk in the shellite which seemed to do the trick. Until the watch fired up and they got stuck together again. At this point I'm thinking it's magnetized but being away from home I didn't have my demagnetizer so I gave the balance a more thorough bath this time pulling out the jewel. Problem solved.

Cleaned mainspring....that was fun trying to get back in it's home!

View attachment 103009

Back together and chuffing away

View attachment 103017

The dial however was not in great shape. I guess the oil had softened the lacquer which I inadvertently scrapped away near the hole :mad: If anyone has one spare they'd be willing to give up I sure would be grateful ;)

View attachment 103025

Amazingly the watch runs +7s/24hr on the wrist without any adjustments. But I won't be able to assess the health of the movement until I return home to my timegrapher.

I'm sure many of my watchmaking techniques were ham fisted and would make a watchmaker cringe but it really was a very satisfying experience to take it through completion and I couldn't have done it without all the excellent info and advice on this site. The one thing I did have a question about though was the dia-fix jewel. The manual said to oil it assembled but my extra fine oiler was too big for the hole so I oiled it prior to assembly like the dia-shock jewel. Was this a mistake?

View attachment 103033
It looks good. Congratulations for the achievement!!

I could only do dial swap, etc.. that kind of stuff, even though I have been with SCWF since 2007. I really admire your courage and skills to accomplish this.

Have a great weekend,

VIncent
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,678 Posts
Great job Jonathan!

I'll get a closer look at that dial I have after work this evening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
ACE! well done...pics of some possible dials to come later....
(3 or 4 of these in bits I just am not going to get around to ever doing...would love to send you something useful).

...ok SeikoPscho is going to have something better than me!....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Now you have two sink holes for your money, watches and watch tools - the watch tools are far more expensive than the watches by the way!

Congrats on your first service :)
Oh how true with about 30k invested in clock tools! eBay is going to be your best friend for a while! Certainly not your bank manager... :rolleyes:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
The manual said to oil it assembled but my extra fine oiler was too big for the hole so I oiled it prior to assembly like the dia-shock jewel. Was this a mistake?

I hope not, ive just put together a 21j 7019 and used the same method as you, its been running fine and keeping good time, plus a couple of 7s26's a little while back.
I believe there is a proper oiling tool for the Diafix.

Welldone, and now your on the slippery slope:grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Once again this is not watch related but clocks are all oiled before being stuffed back together :) As long as it's oiled and not over oiled and it's running as you said it is then I wouldn't worry and just give yourself a GIANT pat on the back and a cold beer to congratulate yourself on a job well done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the encouraging words guys.

Up next is a Bell-Matic that only has about 4 times as many parts. This could be where it all ends in tears! :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Thanks for all the encouraging words guys.

Up next is a Bell-Matic that only has about 4 times as many parts. This could be where it all ends in tears! :eek:
Would love to hear how you get along with this. I've got 3 of the little blighters to do for a friend none of which work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,232 Posts
Congratulations I am most impressed. I have done a lot of the work like repairing the automatic winding mechanism, dial removal, hands removal/replacement, etc but not yet tackled the actual workings.

Someday maybe !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hi I am planning to restore my 6119-6023 Gold Dial, Looking for crystal glass,ring(Bezel),and all the gasket in betweens, sets of 3 hands, inner Ratating bezel. Appreciate if you can help me, where to get all these parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
Hi I am planning to restore my 6119-6023 Gold Dial, Looking for crystal glass,ring(Bezel),and all the gasket in betweens, sets of 3 hands, inner Ratating bezel. Appreciate if you can help me, where to get all these parts.

Going to be tough coming by some of those parts - I just picked some up for a -6023 that I recently bought. The glass and gasket are the same as the much sought after 6105, so I think that aftermarket will be your best bet there. I suggest a WTB post for the crystal and all gaskets. The bezel, rotating ring and hands willl be tougher. I was lucky enough to find a case (no movement, dial, or hands) on ebay - that, or a donor watch, may be your best bet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,820 Posts
Once again this is not watch related but clocks are all oiled before being stuffed back together :) As long as it's oiled and not over oiled and it's running as you said it is then I wouldn't worry and just give yourself a GIANT pat on the back and a cold beer to congratulate yourself on a job well done!



I and anyone in the trade I know of who oils clocks does them (the recesses around the pivots) after the movements are assembled. M/springs are greased before the lids are put on.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top