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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seiko USA did a out of warranty repair/service and the movement is awesome. Over the years, I got the watch wet, and it showed condensation. I'd open it up, dry it, but eventually, it stopped. Every so often, I'd take it out, and it would start right up but stop after a day or two. After the movement servicing, its again my daily wear watch - and accurate, oh my. But it is not water resistant, which bums me out; and don't bother trying to read the watch in the dark.

Good news: the watch was always accurate; and find after the servicing it is +/- 5 sd; Oddly, the watch is slow, despite multiple returns to Seiko USA to set it fast. (Seems to void my 1 yr warranty if a non-seiko person makes repairs. But I might just tweak the calibration on my own, given the bad news)

Bad news: it is not water resistant. Seiko said they do not have any gaskets; ignoring they quoted me to repair/replace the movement and gaskets. My watch, one owner, had it all my life, and wear it daily; speaks well of Seiko quality,

As I look at watch, and read this forum, appears to confirm what I already knew - all original. My observations:
  • the lume on the hands seams to start at the same place, and the hands have a crease in them, not flat. Guessing this helps make them more ridgid, Do I have that right?
  • who knew, corners of the calendar should be round, of course mine are.
  • Japan has a flat "A".
  • happy to report this case has never been polished, that dull look is years of loving wear, and every ding or scratch the result of living life to the fullest.

Really bothers me that the watch isn't water resistant, and the lume, practically useless. Would welcome the second hand to have that red dot refreshed; and the bezel, seems to have an empty dot at the 12 o'clock position. Looking for your insight - would like to keep it original, but would equally like to have the dial, crystal, bezel improved - and water resistant.

What's your thoughts? Having spent $300 USA to ge the movement serviced (great investment) what can I do about the lume, crystal, and gaskets so I get a water resistant watch back as it used to be?
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dr
 

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There are several expert restorers on this site that I’m sure will reach out to you. Your watch can be properly brought back and will look incredible.


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+1 on @Vette Enthusiast

He did my 6105-8110 total rescue rebuild plus he has now re-lumed 3 different 6105-8110 dials and hand sets for me.

Just one of his many great reads:


Late Add: Note in the rebuild thread above John aka @Vette Enthusiast did the very difficult job of removing the old broken worthless crown seal and rebuilt the crown assembly to be water resistant once again. Trust me SEIKO USA does not do these sort of things !
 

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Craftsman
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Happy to help here on this 6105 diver. I would recommend dial and hand relume and all new gaskets including rebuild of the crown with new crown gasket. Happy to evaluate and discuss service options depending on how the watch is running. I am able to upgrade with mainspring arbor port jeweling on these due to wear which is a common occurrence on the 6105 movements. I seriously doubt if Seiko USA did anything with the crown which was designed as a non serviceable item and is likely why moisture enters the watch.


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I had a 6105 like yours with the wabi hands and it just bothered me until I sold it for $550 years ago. NOW, the watch sells over a grand! So, take Vette Enthusiast up and give him the business IMO. The watch is an investment at this point....
 

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Seiko USA did a out of warranty repair/service and the movement is awesome. Over the years, I got the watch wet, and it showed condensation.

dr
Too bad you did not come to this forum first, the Seiko Service Center is more or less a waste of money in my experience. An independent watchmaker or skilled hobbiest will often do much better work, knows all the AM gaskets that fit, will rebuild the crown and replace the gasket, all for about the same price you paid Seiko. We all make the same gaffs when trying to get mechanical watches serviced for the first time, especially with the rate watchmakers are disappearing.

I second the Vette Enthusiast recommendation, here is my 8110 that John just finished a few weeks ago. To be fair, mine was in much better condition to start though, so be aware that some wear just can't be fixed without impacting the originality of the watch.

Also note, even after the gaskets are replaced and a pressure test is performed, vintage watches still can have issues with water tightness, much more so than newer watches. Water tightness is dependent on fresh seals and the watch still being within original manufacturing tolerances. A watch that has been used for 50 years has had the case back opened, crown pulled hundreds of times, bezel turned thousands of times, etc., etc. The use puts the components out of tolerance, and even with good gaskets, leaks can occur. Still, a good service person should be able to get the watch water tight for normal use (washing dishes, light submersion, maybe showering, swimming, etc.), probably pretty risky to ever dive with it again though.

.... Just my 2 cents.

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
All better - beautiful, but... somehow disappointed. I'll explain:

I had the watched serviced - just the lume, gaskets, and water tested by Jack, and its beautiful, I mean "pop"; worked performed by Jack Alexyon; www.internationalwatchworks.com

The other fine people you folks pointed me towards wouldn't do what I wanted unless they did a full service. Jack offered to do just what I wanted/needed.

Jack was great to work with, quoted $350, then noted an option as my minute/hour hands had been replaced years ago by Seiko (while Seiko, not the original) , when they didn't have the exact identical hands - who knew. So for another $150, which I accepted, Jack put back original hands. The watch, dial, hands, bezel, new saphire crystal are glorious. I mean the lume/crystal/dial are prestine. Even Jack commented the watch is awesome, and came to him in great shape.

But: this will be odd.
1) For 6 months I was showing off the watch, because Seiko had made it working, but the crystal was scratched, some dings in the bezel, and most prominent, the lume on the dial and hands had some dark spots. But anyone who looked at the watch, 50 yrs old, said ohhhh and ahhhh.

2) After Jack's service, the watch dial looks brand new - the lume will illuminate into the night. And when I show it off as a 50 yr old watch - they say "nothing", no more ohhhs and ahhhs. So unexpected.

There is likely no finer example of a 6105-8119 than my watch. Intentionally the case front/back was not polished out - so its the original watch still. So odd, as perfect as it is, lost something in having it improved. Go figure.
$300 + $300 + $150. But it is awesome. Jack discouraged me from taking a vintage watch diving. But I do it anyway - its not so much a vintage collectable - just my 24x7 daily wear, never take off, 6105.

dr

here tis...

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We had an antique car (1929) and it was not a ground-up chassis-off resto, just a professional paint job and upholstery. Before those 2 things were done, it was a pure conversation starter. Once it was nearly like-new, few would stop to talk about it. It was odd - when it was 'old looking' people gravitated to it, but once restored, they saw it as a 'show car' and the magic pull was gone.

So I hear you @drwiremore.

And for the record, while yours is a nice looker indeed, don't get too star-struck my dear doctor. There are many nicer examples out there. One of mine included and it's nowhere near some others :)
 

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We had an antique car (1929) and it was not a ground-up chassis-off resto, just a professional paint job and upholstery. Before those 2 things were done, it was a pure conversation starter. Once it was nearly like-new, few would stop to talk about it. It was odd - when it was 'old looking' people gravitated to it, but once restored, they saw it as a 'show car' and the magic pull was gone.

So I hear you @drwiremore.

And for the record, while yours is a nice looker indeed, don't get too star-struck my dear doctor. There are many nicer examples out there. One of mine included and it's nowhere near some others :)
When something like a watch or vehicle goes in for a full restoration, in a way, it loses its previous life and starts fresh again (depending on just how much is done). Sometimes it's needed no doubt, and other times after the work is done it can detract from the overall character. For watches specifically, I can't and won't say which one is better, as this sort of thing is absolutely a case by case basis. I will say though, that I think it's really cool when a timepiece can be brought back to a fully usable state while keeping its past life so to speak. :)

Another thing is being happy with the piece we have. Easier said than done in this internet age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
...while yours is a nice looker indeed, don't get too star-struck my dear doctor. There are many nicer examples out there. One of mine included and it's nowhere near some others :)
I noodled on this, Grammarofdesign, for a while - and your likely right, but let me re-phrase.

This is not some collector's watch - it is a daily wear utility watch (once used as a small nail hammer) never polished, glorius reconditioned hands/lume, worn daily for 50 yrs 24x7. Vintage watch phoey. I use it as the builders likely intended - swimming, diving, boating, flying, and when I'm painting/cutting/building (but do avoid chemicals).

Yeah, maybe a little star-struck - its back, and as I write this note, got my smile back on wearing it. Don't need external ohhhh/ahhhhs, I know what I got - and it keeps +/- 2sd time. Glorius in its look/feel, and how I need to flip my wist just this way or that to keep it centered just right on my arm,

Yup, a little star-stuck that there is likely no nicer examples of a working man's daily wear, 24x7 50 yr old 6105-8119. :cool:

But, perhaps out of respect, if I see a loose small nail, I'll find a hammer.

dw
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yup, a little star-stuck that there is likely no nicer examples of a working man's daily wear, 24x7 50 yr old 6105-8119. :cool:

dw
Show/tell time - the lume is out of sight. Thanks Jack. Exactly as I wanted, all the dings of a lifetime, and a lume that pops, I have a video, but can't figure out how to add it. Well, I could put it on a web site and link it, but, nah.
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