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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I found watch I had all through high school but alas it was in a box of stuff from mum and dad and the battery died in the movement....bit of a clean...but battery gets hot and nothing happens with the watch....

I will strip it down but looks like a cheap donor is in order....

How do I get the crown out?

I have poked and prodded an pushed...confused?

I know this is a cheapie...but sentimental value...

Thanks in advance.
 

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At the end of the "push" arrowhead, there's a hole - use some magnification to look inside and then pull the crown to different positions, in one position you'll see an arm appear - push it with a handy implement (not farming) and remove the crown and stem.
DON'T lose the contact spring!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Got crown out.

Stripped movement and cleaned out all the blue gunk from everywhere!

I assume metho is ok for cleaning quartz?

I put it all back together and AHA it works!

The alarm screen flashes a little but rest is ok...

Small spring? There wasn't one when I opened the back.

Can I substitute anything? Thankyou :)
 

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You might be able to use a spring from a spring bar, just make sure it's not too strong that it'll cause damage. It's the alarm sounder contact.
 
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By any chance does anyone know where to find some technical sheets on the Miyota 4800-01A movement? Looks like I got here four years too late.
I would like to see that tech. sheet as well, since it is nowhere to be found (at least where I searched) on the web. By the way, what kind of button-cell does this movement operates on if anyone would be so kind to provide this information - thanks in advance
 

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I would like to see that tech. sheet as well, since it is nowhere to be found (at least where I searched) on the web. By the way, what kind of button-cell does this movement operates on if anyone would be so kind to provide this information - thanks in advance
I just received an older watch with the 4800-01A movement and it had a 391 button cell in it.
 

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Thank you for providing the link! I'll look into it :)
Don't bother. I just tried to buy one and they couldn't fill the order. I had to buy a donor watch on eBay for $25. I hope that will allow me to get my Waltham version of this watch running (in mint condition and with a working digital and non-working analog movement). There is someone on eBay right now selling a card of 10 movements for about $100, but that is too excessive for me. Why the guy doesn't selling them per each escapes me. I mean, who needs more than one of these?
 

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Don't bother. I just tried to buy one and they couldn't fill the order. I had to buy a donor watch on eBay for $25. I hope that will allow me to get my Waltham version of this watch running (in mint condition and with a working digital and non-working analog movement). There is someone on eBay right now selling a card of 10 movements for about $100, but that is too excessive for me. Why the guy doesn't selling them per each escapes me. I mean, who needs more than one of these?
There are quite a lot of possible donor watches with functional movements by different manufactures out there, like "casio; seiko; citizen; sanyo; adec; meister-anker; q&q; etc (almost every manufacturer that at one time focused on digital /analog-digital watches)" that might be cheap to get. I bought one this weekend for two Euro (flea market found) that works nicely with the prior mentioned 391 button cell. The crown and push-button positions are mandatory to be consider beforehand and that's that. $25 for a semi-functional movement (or was this the soon to be replaced one) seems to be a lousy deal. The mentioned seller wants to get rid of his movements wholesale I suppose (maybe he operates of a different commercial level)?!

I hope you'll be able to repair the analog portion of the movement though, or the new functional movement works out! Good luck either way!
This link might be of interest to you, even though there is no English translation yet -> maybe contact someone like him for instructions?!
Also for some analog-digital watches there are tech. manuals which "maybe" helpful.
 

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There are quite a lot of possible donor watches with functional movements by different manufactures out there, like "casio; seiko; citizen; sanyo; adec; meister-anker; q&q; etc (almost every manufacturer that at one time focused on digital /analog-digital watches)" that might be cheap to get. I bought one this weekend for two Euro (flea market found) that works nicely with the prior mentioned 391 button cell. The crown and push-button positions are mandatory to be consider beforehand and that's that. $25 for a semi-functional movement (or was this the soon to be replaced one) seems to be a lousy deal. The mentioned seller wants to get rid of his movements wholesale I suppose (maybe he operates of a different commercial level)?!

I hope you'll be able to repair the analog portion of the movement though, or the new functional movement works out! Good luck either way!
This link might be of interest to you, even though there is no English translation yet -> maybe contact someone like him for instructions?!
Also for some analog-digital watches there are tech. manuals which "maybe" helpful.
Thanks for your comments and the links. Great stuff there. You are absolutely right about how common this movement was in its day. I'm hoping the donor watch I just bought will do the trick. It is an identical watch case and the same movement with both analog and digital functioning with no LCD "hemorrhaging". This watch is a Celsius 9 and it turns out there were about 10 different manufacturers who private labeled the exact same watch. The one I'm repairing is a Waltham (there is a photo of it on the site you linked) but the donor is an Armitron. I don't usually attempt to repair the mechanical portion of a quartz watch (other than giving it a spray of cleaner as a last resort) because it is usually simple to swap the whole movement out for less than $20 if you can buy one new. The watch in question was designed by Citizen (hence the Miyota movement). My example is a very nice one that has hardly been worn and I have the original box and papers. It's a cool looking watch, but these were very inexpensive and for many years a dime a dozen and not built well. I think not many have survived so their value has increased a little bit due to rarity. Mine was a thrift store find and the condition is almost new old stock. Just dirty so I will be disassembling completely and doing a good ultrasonic cleaning.

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Thanks for your comments and the links. Great stuff there. You are absolutely right about how common this movement was in its day. I'm hoping the donor watch I just bought will do the trick. It is an identical watch case and the same movement with both analog and digital functioning with no LCD "hemorrhaging". This watch is a Celsius 9 and it turns out there were about 10 different manufacturers who private labeled the exact same watch. The one I'm repairing is a Waltham (there is a photo of it on the site you linked) but the donor is an Armitron. I don't usually attempt to repair the mechanical portion of a quartz watch (other than giving it a spray of cleaner as a last resort) because it is usually simple to swap the whole movement out for less than $20 if you can buy one new. The watch in question was designed by Citizen (hence the Miyota movement). My example is a very nice one that has hardly been worn and I have the original box and papers. It's a cool looking watch, but these were very inexpensive and for many years a dime a dozen and not built well. I think not many have survived so their value has increased a little bit due to rarity. Mine was a thrift store find and the condition is almost new old stock. Just dirty so I will be disassembling completely and doing a good ultrasonic cleaning.

View attachment 491950
My pleasure!
Since the condition of your watch is almost pristine and it comes with the original box and papers I stand corrected with my previous comment, regarding the price of the donor watch. Money well spent! It is a nice looking watch and I like the fact, that it is equipped with a bezel.
 

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All cleaned and the movement from the donor watch installed. The donor had a very fresh looking and perfectly running movement and I’m very pleased with how it turned out.
View attachment 492265
I am glad that the donor movement worked out for you in the end!
It is always very satisfying after spending energy, time and money to see a positive and presentable result - well done!!
 

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I am glad that the donor movement worked out for you in the end!
It is always very satisfying after spending energy, time and money to see a positive and presentable result - well done!!
Thanks! I also should say that this original thread was about trouble removing the setting stem from the watch. It took me quite a while to find the right spot to press, but perseverance and patience eventually paid off. Not the easiest spot to find. I shall call it the G-Spot ;).
 
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