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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all.

I'm looking for some information on a Seiko 6138 watch
things i'm interested in knowing are.

1) manufacture date
2) Model name
3) is the seconds hand original?
4) what's the most likely problem with the pushers, orings?

Please don't PM me, I can't respond to PM's due to post count :-(
 

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Need to get your post count up so you can post pics

There should be 4 digits after 6138 on the caseback. What are they? There should also be a six or seven character serial number on the caseback. Is the caseback stamped water proof or water-resist? That will get you on your way to figuring out its age and style.

Hi all.

I'm looking for some information on a Seiko 6138 watch
things i'm interested in knowing are.

1) manufacture date
2) Model name
3) is the seconds hand original?
4) what's the most likely problem with the pushers, orings?

Please don't PM me, I can't respond to PM's due to post count :-(
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok found some interesting info, date was 1974, i was pretty sure it was from the 70's, but i thought it was later.

Movement Number: 6138
Serial Number: 431431
Production Date: March 1974
 

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Looks great Watcher02. You're lucky to find one with the original bracelet. Crystal will need replacing and one of the hands needs to be relumed. Seconds hand may have been painted but the dial looks original. You should ask the seller if the pushers are sticky (hopefully not), and whether the sundials and seconds hands reset exactly to 12 o'clock. Bear in mind that it may need servicing soon, and that can be comparatively expensive and you might have trouble finding a local guy to do it. Good luck with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thanks tritto
It's actually my father's watch, who gave it top me a few years back.
I had it for a while, but never worn as I had issues with the pushers.

last year I took it with me to Japan, and tried to get it fixed.
The "watchmaker" didnt seem professional, and after removing the back and having a quick glance, he quotes me $200 and returned the watch with the pushers/springs in a ziploc bag. and the watch no longer worked.

Could't really express my frustration in Japanese, so i had to leave the shop, and implode :-(

I've had bad luck finding someone in sydney who is a proper watchmaker, let alone at a reasonable price that wont cost more to repair than buy new

that's the story of the watch.

Does anyone know the name? does it have a name?
 

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Great to have your fathers watch mate.

I think it's referred to as Big Blue or Kakume. I don't know the origin of that name.

The pushers are relatively easy to reinsert. Slightly lift the movement ring that goes around the outside between the movement and the case. Insert both pushers with springs in place. Push in the pushers and drop the ring back into place. Your issue with the pushers might be that they need lubrication. A tiny amount of silicone grease on the pusher gaskets could help so you could do that first.

As for service, I'm in Hobart so I don't know your options there. Maybe someone else can chime in. My guy in Hobart services these for about $150. If you like I can ask if he takes postage jobs. I have to go in and pick up a 6139 in a couple of days. He usually has a wait of about a month for a full service.
 

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Ok you can compare it to mine if you like. Mines a 1976 NOS watch :rolleyes:





Just had to put this in.... it's the original page the watch came in :eek:hmy:

 

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What tritto has said is spot on. Where are you in this world watcher02? The o-rings are best replaced as they go hard as a rock. Also the pushers get full up with crap and a little bit of peg wood moved around the insider will clear that out nicely. You night even be able to buy new pushers off Stefan aka seikochrono on this forum complete with new o-rings if you don't fancy cleaning the old ones or if the ends are bent. What I would say is if you clean out the gunk from the case side be careful as you don't want a load of dirt going into that movement! Easily done. You can always put a little tissue paper into the pusher holes first but I would still be very careful if you do undertake the repair yourself. You will need a case back opening tool really and have a good read on this forum where someone has done a service guide for say a 6139-6000 or otherwise known as a Pepsi or Pogue.

Good luck!
 

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I assume he's in Sydney, Australia. There are a few Aussies here so there must be a member who can recommend a good watch guy in Sydney.
 

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I assume he's in Sydney, Australia. There are a few Aussies here so there must be a member who can recommend a good watch guy in Sydney.
Damn these old eyes I didn't spot that! What I do find amazing is watcher joined this forum the year before he was born according to his... or her personal data :eek:
 

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He's come back in time to fix his fathers watch before there are no old watchmakers left in the world who can service it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sydney, Australia guys.
Actually i was referred to a watchmaker in North Sydney, but was well out of my price range. i was silly enough to think it'd be any cheaper or better in Japan.

I get the sense that i could probably tell more about what is wrong with the back removed, is there any tool type in parrticular I need? or any watch opening tool should suffice?

Stunning watch clockbloke, i wish mine looked as nice as yours.
They seem to have some slight differences in the hands and bezel, they did a few editions on these, right?
 

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Sydney, Australia guys.
Actually i was referred to a watchmaker in North Sydney, but was well out of my price range. i was silly enough to think it'd be any cheaper or better in Japan.

I get the sense that i could probably tell more about what is wrong with the back removed, is there any tool type in parrticular I need? or any watch opening tool should suffice?

Stunning watch clockbloke, i wish mine looked as nice as yours.
They seem to have some slight differences in the hands and bezel, they did a few editions on these, right?
Yeah I think yours is a couple of years earlier than mine. Your strap is different but I believe yours has the better version of strap. My hands are different because they are not sun bleeched. Also the colours on your dial are a little faded too on the sub dials. Just a fact of living where there is plenty of sunshine! No fear of that happening here in the UK!!!!!

I've replaced the pushers on my 6138-0011 ok. There are plently of guides on this forum. I brought a cheapish case opening tool off fleabuy for the job. A good pair of tweasers and you should be in business but you will likely find unless you plan on going into this as a hobby your can likely get the watch repaired correctly by someone off this forum for the same cost as those tools you'll need.

http://www.thewatchsite.com/d1/files/Seiko Technical Manuals/6138A.pdf

That shows how to remove the movement & pushers. Just don't hold the watch upside down with the back off or the movement can drop slightly, which wont harm it but it might make you jump and drop the whole lot on the floor and that will damage it :)
 

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Your watch probably doesn't need a full service, just a tidy up of the pushers - as has been said - they get old, the seals get hard and they stick in when they are pushed. Not hard to do - when you know what you are doing.

And, as a fellow Sydney-sider, like everything else in Sydney, watchmakers are expensive.

Servicing these types of watches is tricky as it's an early chronograph and parts are hard to come by. So a lot of watchmakers won't even want to open the back. And if they do, put aside a least a couple of hundred dollars if everything is OK and only a simple service is needed.

I have several Seiko 6138s and instead of a service, a couple of times, i've bought working watches cheap-ish and stripped them for their movements. Cheaper than getting the movement serviced.

You could try this guy - http://vintagetimeaustralia.com/

I haven't used him before and he is in South Australia, not Sydney, but I have swapped a couple of emails with him and he seems to know what he is talking about. And he seems to be a fan of Seikos.

Clockblokes sample pictures show a Japanese Domestic Market version of the watch - yours is a 'export' model. The difference is in the hands and dial - the JDM models often have 'Speedtimer' on the dial.

Yours watch looks reasonably legitimate - except for the seconds/chronograph hand and the subdial hands. Getting NOS replacements for these is pretty tricky and if you do a full restore, you may have to use aftermarket replacements.

Nice to have the original bracelet as well.

Good luck
 

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Your watch probably doesn't need a full service, just a tidy up of the pushers - as has been said - they get old, the seals get hard and they stick in when they are pushed. Not hard to do - when you know what you are doing.

And, as a fellow Sydney-sider, like everything else in Sydney, watchmakers are expensive.

Servicing these types of watches is tricky as it's an early chronograph and parts are hard to come by. So a lot of watchmakers won't even want to open the back. And if they do, put aside a least a couple of hundred dollars if everything is OK and only a simple service is needed.

I have several Seiko 6138s and instead of a service, a couple of times, i've bought working watches cheap-ish and stripped them for their movements. Cheaper than getting the movement serviced.

You could try this guy - http://vintagetimeaustralia.com/

I haven't used him before and he is in South Australia, not Sydney, but I have swapped a couple of emails with him and he seems to know what he is talking about. And he seems to be a fan of Seikos.

Clockblokes sample pictures show a Japanese Domestic Market version of the watch - yours is a 'export' model. The difference is in the hands and dial - the JDM models often have 'Speedtimer' on the dial.

Yours watch looks reasonably legitimate - except for the seconds/chronograph hand and the subdial hands. Getting NOS replacements for these is pretty tricky and if you do a full restore, you may have to use aftermarket replacements.

Nice to have the original bracelet as well.

Good luck
Oh cool I found out something about my watch too :grin: Gotta love this site!
 

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Your Dad's watch?

Wow. That's a keeper for me. Especially a 6138 that looks like it will clean up beautifully. And an original bracelet! :great:
 
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