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Discussion Starter #1
I have this gorgeous January 1973 King Seiko KS 5626-7170 that I just finished bringing up to proper state of cleanliness and sorted. This particular model has the movement unique ID stamped into the bridge and has "Chronometer Officially Certified" on the dial. Will post pix later.

Is it possible to ask Seiko for the Cert showing the Chronometer Certification?

This was after they split from the Swiss Chronometer convention after sweeping the board in earlier Swiss competitions. So it must be a Seiko Certification, no? 5 or 6 positions? 3 Temps.? This info not stamped into the bridges nor rotor.

Thanks in Advance !
 

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I have a 5626-5029 Officially Certified model from 1972.




I picked this up a few years ago on the bay for just a few dollars as the lack of KS markings kept it under most peoples radars.

I would also be interested in any information you are able to find on these as I have not seen details on how these were certified.
 

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almost half a century ago this COSC criteria was almost what it is today...assuming seiko tested along those lines,,,wow!!! nice
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
After a Lot more Google research, I see the Japanese Chronometer Institute used the -1/+10 sec per day standard. Gonna have to regulate this bad boy, he's coming in at +12 spd on the first day of wearing on the wrist. Not that that's bad for a 41 year old watch !

I also see that the 5626A movement had the full "5 positions 3 Temps" engraved on the rotor. By the time the 5626B went into production it appears not. So I'm not upset that my rotor does not indicate the testing conditions. It seems all OK and legit.

Definitely an all-original dial in terrific condition. The bezel has not a single mar or scratch and the faceted crystal (see side shot) is super cool in that '70's funk way and yet still looks completely at ease.

I dig how the long minute hand requires a stepped profile hour marker to avoid interference. Pretty cool.


Pix attached. Sorry for the crappy camera phone photos, and with my naked eye (even looking really close) I don't see a single peice of fuzzy crap on the crystal - it's some weird camera deal. (Edit: Just figured out this photo issue: The individual minute marker marks are being seen on the side of the edge bezel ! )
 

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