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Discussion Starter #61
Point was to maintain them. Like you hopefully will with your Porsche, no matter what miles you do.

Anyway thread has descended into missing the point entirely and ultimately getting to the point were one side is ridiculing the other. Nice. :)


All in fun, Guy. I was surprised sex was mentioned.in the thread. Having said that, I wear my watches during all physical activities.


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Can someone please explain why one would shower with a watch other than at a gym or beach when you are just rinsing off? Seriously, why would I bathe wearing a watch? It just makes it harder to wash your wrist. I don't even wear my wedding ring in the shower.


Some of us wear our watches (& wedding rings) 24/7. I never take my watch off except for when rotating to a different watch. Additionally wearing it in the shower cleans it ;) and allows one to tell the time in the shower - important some days when running late.


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no, but seriously, i have a question.

i never wear an antique into any water, period. why should i when i have some cheap, new beaters? i live on a river, and i swim every day for 4 months or so, nice clear fresh cold water, and to no great depth. i do snorkel to watch the trout.

so my question is, how long do i have with a cheap, new beater ( dagaz aurora, say, or seiko sne497, or a new mini turtle, these are all comparable 2-3 hundred dollar watches) before i should start worrying about changing gaskets? i'd guess about 2 years in this clean environment. and if water gets into a watch, will it be visible through the crystal, or, not necessarily so?
 

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no, but seriously, i have a question.

i never wear an antique into any water, period. why should i when i have some cheap, new beaters? i live on a river, and i swim every day for 4 months or so, nice clear fresh cold water, and to no great depth. i do snorkel to watch the trout.

so my question is, how long do i have with a cheap, new beater ( dagaz aurora, say, or seiko sne497, or a new mini turtle, these are all comparable 2-3 hundred dollar watches) before i should start worrying about changing gaskets? i'd guess about 2 years in this clean environment. and if water gets into a watch, will it be visible through the crystal, or, not necessarily so?
Gasket changes are the cheapest servicing we do on our watches, costs next to nothing so why delay ? car serviced every year so change the gaskets on a watch you use regularly every year ?
 

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😂😂😂😂😂😂👍👍👍👍👍 Peter is it the Hops and Barley Seiko Recommend that Lubricate and look after the Gaskets😜
Neilo, the secret is in the premium rice they use instead of barley :grin:
 

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This topic may well outrun that of the 'which is better J or K version'
😂😂 Don I’m hoping it does. Best entertainment we’ve had in a long while Since Hokuseiko was rattling everyone’s cages😜
 

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Neilo, the secret is in the premium rice they use instead of barley :grin:
Peter Sir it’s the Starch in the Rice then Right? that blocks the Soap and Shower Pressure getting to the Gaskets😂 I knew it was a Scientific Alcohol 🍺 Beverage
Answer we’ve all been waiting for😜
 

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Somewhere I have a nice graphic showing that the density of water from about the coldest a human can endure to about the hottest a human can endure is virtually unchanged, and certainly not changed enough to slip past seals.


No "graphic" then :( and it wouldn't prove this "certainly not changed enough to slip past seals. "



In practice I have experience with customer's watches that have been fine in cold water but hot water has got past the seals and in some cases ruined the movements and dials etc.



Don't wear classic divers (or any watch you really value / is older / collectible etc) in water :)
 

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Somewhere I have a nice graphic showing that the density of water from about the coldest a human can endure to about the hottest a human can endure is virtually unchanged, and certainly not changed enough to slip past seals.


No "graphic" then :( and it wouldn't prove this "certainly not changed enough to slip past seals. "



In practice I have experience with customer's watches that have been fine in cold water but hot water has got past the seals and in some cases ruined the movements and dials etc.



Don't wear classic divers (or any watch you really value / is older / collectible etc) in water :)

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Almost everyone dislikes cheap crappy aftermarket parts in Vintage Divers (like awful looking AM dials and hand sets). Why are there so many Vintage Divers for sale with cheap horrible looking dial and hand sets.

WATER

Watches were used as intended and Water Intrusion degraded or ruined the Dials and Hand Sets. Sure many of the watches were probably not properly cared for by their owners and gaskets were not regularly replaced but they were still ruined because of:

WATER

The hard to find all original examples of Vintage Divers that have survived in excellent condition are here because they were either NEVER used in the Water or those that were in water were carefully maintained by their previous owners. Original Examples in Excellent Condition are becoming very hard to find and IMO should be kept that way. The only way to assure that Vintage Divers are kept in Excellent Condition is to properly maintain them including new gaskets and.... Not use them in Water. Wear them with Pride but Why Take the Risk with them in the Water.

Does anyone want to see MORE cheap crappy aftermarket Dials and Hand Sets in Vintage Divers?
 
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