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Discussion Starter #21
These are sentimental and valuable things to own. Maybe take the watch off for the time it takes to shower?

Gaskets need replacing or at least should be checked every year or so if diving iirc. What about the temperature changes? Chemicals and oils and so on? How does that affect the gasket?

If you are gonna shower with it in hot steamy water expect to check those seals even sooner, expect the air inside the case to heat up. Expect your lubricants to degrade sooner, expect moist air to be sucked back into the case as it cools, stay in crevices under the rotating ring, expect rust to form, expect parts to wear, the spring to rust in the crown, pitting to develop under the caseback etc etc etc.

I mean, yes it was fine forty years ago, oh but which are the watches everyone wants? Yip, the ones that likely never saw ANY water. Let alone showering...

Knock a crown and you have compromised a seal. Gaskets flatten over time, why do you think they are so flat when you get your "new" vintage watch? You keep getting it wet and hot and dry or damp and that gasket will degrade and flatten sooner.

These were diver's watches with the word RESIST on the dial for a reason. Remember why it changed from Proof to RESIST? Because no watch is fully water proof. And no watch is air proof..... These seals expand and contact. They let in air and air can get out. Moist, or rather humid, air is what the seals protect my watches against.

Take it off. Look after the strap aswell as the watch.


Very thorough explanation, Guy. Thanks for your excellent insight.

Kat


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Can someone please explain why one would shower with a watch other than at a gym or beach when you are just rinsing off? Seriously, why would I bathe wearing a watch? It just makes it harder to wash your wrist. I don't even wear my wedding ring in the shower.
A valid point, often when i've been grafting when I remove my watch to wash apart from sweat there can be dirt under the strap/head so as above easier to get clean without a watch on (imo).

I water proof all my shoes, even trainers but I never shower in them :)
 

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Also another reason to not take a vintage into water is availability of parts. It might be pressure tested but there's always risk. There are just too many external variables that would cause water ingress. You could get tiny droplets in the watch that you wouldn't know about for years only to one day see rust when you take it apart. With modern watches, it's relatively easy to find replacement part or just get another watch.

But with vintage divers its quite the opposite. I'm always tempted to take my vintage into the pool and YES shower with it too as they come out clean and shinny.. but I'd never do it. I have Gshock and a monster for that stuff.

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Personally, I would change all the gaskets presure test and go for it. It's like not driving an old Porsche in the rain.
 

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VTA makes great gaskets. Get a set and have it pressure tested.


My 6309, which I've had since new, has been in more hot tubs, showers, oceans, waterfalls, sprinklers, etc. than I can count. It has never leaked. My lume is gray. Maybe some moisture has gotten in it. My Dad's 6309 has rarely been in the water and the lume is creamy white.



My only issue with showering is that soap lowers the surface tension of water and the water can get past the seals more easily. So, I limit my showering with a watch on. After an ocean swim, a shower is a sure way to get the salt out. 37 years and not a single spot of rust under the lid.



I know people with old, valuable vintage cars who drive them a lot. 300,000 miles on one Porsche 356. He also maintains it extensively. Just loves driving it. I use my Diving watches for water sports and maintain them.
 

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If it's in good condition, no corrosion to any seal mating part and fitted with new seals, I see no reason to not use it underwater. Aint that what it was intended for ;)
 

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What about driving a vintage car every day in and out to work? Maybe stick 100,000 miles on it over a couple of years? :)

Depends on the vintage car. A 911? No. A Volvo 240? Sure. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Also another reason to not take a vintage into water is availability of parts. It might be pressure tested but there's always risk. There are just too many external variables that would cause water ingress. You could get tiny droplets in the watch that you wouldn't know about for years only to one day see rust when you take it apart. With modern watches, it's relatively easy to find replacement part or just get another watch.

But with vintage divers its quite the opposite. I'm always tempted to take my vintage into the pool and YES shower with it too as they come out clean and shinny.. but I'd never do it. I have Gshock and a monster for that stuff.

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Good point about parts availability.


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Anyway Kat irrespective of it being a diver or dress watch the seals/gaskets should be updated as and when needed because we have all seen so many vintage watches ruined for the sake of a failed/old gasket/gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Anyway Kat irrespective of it being a diver or dress watch the seals/gaskets should be updated as and when needed because we have all seen so many vintage watches ruined for the sake of a failed/old gasket/gaskets.


Yes, I can understand that. I have just recently gotten interested in vintage Seiko watches.


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HOT Water imho is the reason more than anything else, why I will never wear a watch Vintage or Newer in HOT water."SHOWER" I gave a good friend Third generation Monster Loves it but has worn her in their Hot Tube Amazingly NO signs of any Damage?? Only yesterday I had him pick out a watch to wear while I send his away to be serviced. He picked out a 6106- 54xx Good Choice He will not wear any watch again In the Hot tube or Shower.
 

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Personally, I would change all the gaskets presure test and go for it. It's like not driving an old Porsche in the rain.
I share the same thinking!...enjoy these vintage beauties to the fullest!...am fully aware of (and prepared for) the consequences.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I share the same thinking!...enjoy these vintage beauties to the fullest!...am fully aware of (and prepared for) the consequences.


I feel fortunate to have found a 6309 in such good original condition. It is even super accurate. Not sure I should push my luck, even after getting the gaskets changed and having it pressure tested. It is an antique, after all....


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I feel fortunate to have found a 6309 in such good original condition. It is even super accurate. Not sure I should push my luck, even after getting the gaskets changed and having it pressure tested. It is an antique, after all....


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With this, you can have peace of mind in using your properly restored 6309 as a tool watch...they were designed and made as such...so, go for it and enjoy!...just please keep in mind the effects of time on the gaskets.
 

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That is why Casio make $30.00 200M watches. Keep the vintage watches dry and wear them with pride. Use the cheapies for swimming.
 
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