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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. My wife left a watch 10 years in her jewelry box and since I have caught my share of WIS syndrome, she wanted to see in what shape it is in.

Turns out, the battery leaked. Not too bad, I could clean most of it and it was mostly confined to the battery compartment.

I put in a new battery and it ran for about a day, then stopped. The battery now looks a bit puffy, but another battery (if the other was at fault) won't make it start again...

So did I just electrocute my wife's watch? Should I have done something after cleaning but before putting a new battery in?

If someone can shed a light on what happened, I would be grateful.
(and I just received a Seiko automatic for her, so if it's dead - good riddance) ;)
 

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well i am sure it is not dead and no you did not electrocute the watch...more than likely there is some corrosion and possible that corrosion is not allowing the battery to do it's job...what model is it?...you may have to take the movement out and disassemble it to see how bad the battery leakage was and if any damage occured to the board and clean anything that looks like it should not be there...well let's start with this...what brand and model number is it?...and even if the movement is sadly non repairable a new donor watch may be in order...but it sounds like you would like to see it gone...God Bless John
 

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I agree with that. When a battery leaks the battery compartment may not look too bad and clean up but the acid fumes get everywhere and can corrode circuit tracks, contacts and metal components.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's a cheap watch from about 2000 ("Meister Anker"). I'm not going to repair it (and I'm not sure I can disassemble this particular movement)- I just wanted to know if I could have done things differently (drowning it in isopropanol?).
For future reference and maybe (fingers crossed that I won't have to) on a not-so cheap watch.
 

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well this makes a great reason for a upgrade...
 

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You cleaned the visible salts...but there is very likely a short caused by salts which have not been cleaned ("puffy battery" = rapid drain). Further, cleaning salts without completely cleaning the movement can leave material in the movement which will block the train. If the circuit/coil have not been permanently damaged revival may simply require disassembly/cleaning/lubrication. Evaluation of the circuit and coil can be done with relatively cheap tester depicted below. Disassembly, etc will require a significant commitment in tools and skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
...and also a movement that's not completely cast in plastic ;)

I really appreciate all the good pointers and helpful advice given here. Let's hope that in the future it helps a poor watch that truly deserves saving.

(That said, maybe I'll take the movement out of the watch and practice on it. I've just gotten my hands removal tool...)
 

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I was in a similar situation with an off-brand cheap watch that stopped working one day (turned out to be a bum coil), but still looked nice. I just got a new Ronda movement online for $12 and swapped the hands over. If you're feeling adventurous (and if the movement is still available cheaply), that's could be a fun/cheap option.
 

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hey it would be great to learn on...that way just in case it is not repairable...you have learned something...i try and fix everything...i guess i am a lot like my grandparents that way...
 
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