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About 35 years of wrist goo congealed into this bracelet and on the back of my recent barn find 7546. How does one clean it? As I said earlier, I'm new to the watch world, and when my SKX007 gets stinky, I just lather it up with some gentle hand soap and voila. Not so much on this old fella.



Thanks!
 

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I take it you do not own a ultra sonic cleaner? These are pretty cheap on eBay and even the low priced ones seem to work ok. Other wise remove the bracelet and soak in warm soapy water for a while. Get an old tooth brush and work all around the bracelet and rinse off. The case back will need to be cleaned up too. If you don't have the tools to remove the stem and take out the dial/movement just use a damp tooth brush and some metal cleaner. I always finish off with a stainless steel cloth. Should come up really well.
 

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If you have an espresso machine use thr steam nozzle. Ultrasonic cleaners are okay but to really remove the crud you need some pressure and heat.
 

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Ultra sonic cleaner works just fine.. For big jobs, you may want to take an old tooth brush and use soap and water to it first would save you some time in the ultra sonic cleaner.
 

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White spirit

I usually clean it thoroughly with dishwash liquid and an old toothbrush before dumping it in a jar of methylated spirit to soak for a day.

After you remove it, rinse under the tap. You will see lots of gunk at the bottom of the jar.
 

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I get a lot of watches from the 60's and 70s that usually are pretty revolting. I use petrol and a toothbrush. Soak the strap in petrol so its covering the metal. You don't really need the toothbrush but it speeds things up if you agitate things. The toothbrush will melt if you leave it in the petrol for a long time. For the case, the petrol would get at any glue on a glass crystal and it would melt plastic crystals. O rings won't stand a chance in petrol either. Only do cases if you can completely strip them first.

I have had two very memorable straps. One I'm sure was used by someone who worked in a chip shop. The strap was so full of grease it could support itself standing straight out, just with the grease inside all the links holding it up. After soaking in petrol, it just flopped about like a normal link bracelet. The other probably belonged to a mechanic and it was equally saturated in black grease. There's some straps I wouldn't put near my ultrasonic cleaner - its for clean things :grin:
 

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The best way is to strip the watch down and start removing scratches..
(1) To get rid of scratches start with coarse sand paper, grade 220.
(2) Switch to dry paper grade 800.
(3) Then use Swiss made 1600 powder coated jewellers paper.
(4) Next use 3M Film sheet polishing (plastic)grade 60 microns and 10 microns (2-3 minutes each).Available from jewellery suppliers only.
(5) Finally, polish on a buffing wheel using Green Steel Rouge.

When I get enough post's I'll add some photo's :)
 

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The best way is to strip the watch down and start removing scratches..
(1) To get rid of scratches start with coarse sand paper, grade 220.
(2) Switch to dry paper grade 800.
(3) Then use Swiss made 1600 powder coated jewellers paper.
(4) Next use 3M Film sheet polishing (plastic)grade 60 microns and 10 microns (2-3 minutes each).Available from jewellery suppliers only.
(5) Finally, polish on a buffing wheel using Green Steel Rouge.
Beside that this thread is about cleaning, not refurbishing, absolutely DO NOT use sand paper of any grade to remove scratches. That will cause not just a lot of work, but will alter the profile permanently. The proper procedure is called buffing, followed by polishing. See it here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMuWrI-sCj8

Buffing MOVES metal, doesn't just REMOVE it.
 

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Beside that this thread is about cleaning, not refurbishing, absolutely DO NOT use sand paper of any grade to remove scratches. That will cause not just a lot of work, but will alter the profile permanently. The proper procedure is called buffing, followed by polishing. See it here:

Buffing MOVES metal, doesn't just REMOVE it.
That's fine if you DON'T have any scratches. But if you do, then you have to use varying grades of sandpaper - I've done it loads of times for a perfect mirror finish when re-shaping some crown guards
 

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That's fine if you DON'T have any scratches. But if you do, then you have to use varying grades of sandpaper - I've done it loads of times for a perfect mirror finish when re-shaping some crown guards
Buffing, asn mentioned before, perfectly remove scratchess without disturbing surfaces and using multiple passes.
 
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