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Discussion Starter #1
Actually, I have some nice old watches (Seiko of course) with mid-high level calibers and running great with no noticeable problem, but "service history unknown".
My question to you, dear specialists, is: is it safe to continue to use them until some problem arise, or do I have to give them a overhaul right now, to avoid the wear of some pieces? What do you do, you?
Is there some calibers more subject to wear than other in the Seiko world?

Thank you for your advice!

Cheers,
Mathieu
 

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Until timekeeping becomes bad, or some significant issue arises, I don't preventatively service. Possibly a mistake to take that view, but given the cost service vs cost to replace is closer to 1:1 on many of our watches (relative to a Rolex or something), I prefer to put it off as long as I can.
 

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Until timekeeping becomes bad, or some significant issue arises, I don't preventatively service. Possibly a mistake to take that view, but given the cost service vs cost to replace is closer to 1:1 on many of our watches (relative to a Rolex or something), I prefer to put it off as long as I can.

I agree! As long as their keeping good time and there are no issues they're good to go as far as I'm concerned. Plus, when you have several in rotation they seldom get worn.
 

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I agree with the above (in some ways wrong ......) but I would always change gaskets when i got a new to me watch, costs next to nothing and it can make all the difference to the life of a watch (imo) plus if i keep the watch for a good while then i will change the gaskets again, like i say costs nothing so why not ? :).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for your advices! That is what I'm doing until now: wait a serious problem ;-)

But I still have scruples with some fine calibres (independently of the cost of a service)... I remember I have read somewhere that high-beat movements are more prone to wear. What is your experience ?

About changing gaskets, John, do you think it is necessary also for non-diver watches? If so, I will immediately follow your advice, but I don't know how to get correct gaskets for all the different cases...


Cheers,
Mathieu
 

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Thank you all for your advices! That is what I'm doing until now: wait a serious problem ;-)

But I still have scruples with some fine calibres (independently of the cost of a service)... I remember I have read somewhere that high-beat movements are more prone to wear. What is your experience ?

About changing gaskets, John, do you think it is necessary also for non-diver watches? If so, I will immediately follow your advice, but I don't know how to get correct gaskets for all the different cases...


Cheers,
Mathieu
Hi Mathieu I have seen many vintage non divers ruined for the sake of a gasket, I will always change gaskets because IMO very important and like i say, so cheap :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Mathieu I have seen many vintage non divers ruined for the sake of a gasket, I will always change gaskets because IMO very important and like i say, so cheap :)
Ok John, would you teach me? As I don't know where to source correct gaskets for my watches...
Thank you!
 

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I agree with the above (in some ways wrong ......) but I would always change gaskets when i got a new to me watch, costs next to nothing and it can make all the difference to the life of a watch (imo) plus if i keep the watch for a good while then i will change the gaskets again, like i say costs nothing so why not ? :).
Good point John. Guess I wasn't thinking because the first thing I always do is install new gaskets and more often then not a new crystal.

I was thinking in terms of movement service only.
 

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In my case I don't do anything until time keeping suffers, or a mechanical fault arrises that requires work to be done. One watch I did send to my watchmaker 4 weeks ago was my Tutima Military chrono, the previous owner manually winding it stripped a gear. It still kept good time when I shook it to make it wind but the thought of bits of metal floating around that beautiful Lemania 5100 made me get it serviced and not cheap at that but well worth it as it is a keeper.

Cheers
Mark
 

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I've been sending all new (to me) watches without service records in for movement service, to establish a baseline.

Even though it's meant losing money on a few watches I wound up selling, I think I'll keep doing it - I just like knowing that everything is ticking away as expected, without introducing unnecessary wear/tear.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've been sending all new (to me) watches without service records in for movement service, to establish a baseline.
If I would have a watchmaker at the corner, I certainly would do the same, at least for a check. But here in Brussels, as I know, not a single one wants even to look at my Seiko's :smiley_confused1:, so I have to think two time before sending it abroad...

Cheers,
Mathieu
 
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