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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I have been reviving some of my old watches (just finished with an original Aqualand) and am now working on my Seiko 5.

First, I would love to date this watch. I have had it since the early 80's and it had some mileage back then. I tried the Seiko calculator and the WWW without luck.

As you know the Model is: 6119 8083
The serial number is: 1N0632

It must be November of '71 or '81, just not sure. It says "Water Resistant" if that helps.

I need to replace the crystal. This will actually be the 2nd or 3rd time I have had to replace it. Is it known to be very fragile? What would be the best way to go about the replacement? Should I go through Seiko or is it simple enough to do myself (no real watch experience but very mechanically minded)?

It is keeping near perfect time even though it has not been worn for about 10 years.

Any suggestions for a band? Leather, SS bracelet etc.. What did it come with standard? It takes and 18mm.

Lastly, what is its general value and is it worth spending the money (obviously a subjective question here but I am interested in your opininons).

Thanks and I look forward to any comments I receive on this.

Best
Don
 

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Hello Don,
Your watch's serial number was stamped in November in 1971- the 6119 was no longer being produced by 1981. It made me smile- you say this will be the 2nd or 3rd crystal you've had on the watch in nearly 30 years- that isn't too bad for an acrylic crystal! They are plastic and scratch easily compared to mineral or sapphire. They don't shatter as readily as the latter two when hit hard, but they can crack, even just with age. A popular US material house shows the crystal number to be 310T10ANS0 (if yours is a stainless steel case), but it is listed as discontinued. There might be a generic available, a quick search shows another material house lists a Sternkreuz crystal (German-made generic) as a substitute: XAC 311.523. I cannot verify this, and crystal fitting can be tricky business because several dimensions have to be right and allow proper clearance for the movement, bezel, dial and hands. I wouldn't recommend trying to figure this one out by yourself unless you are willing to spend just as much money trying to get a crystal to fit properly without damaging it during insertion, as you would to let a watchmaker install one. You'd need a crystal press, and the knowledge that quite often, even the proper crystal doesn't go in just right due to variances/damage in the case, necessitating the need to buy two or more. Installing the wrong crystal can damage important components as well, so there is risk involved if not careful when substituting generic crystals.

If the watch hasn't been worn for 10 years, the gaskets should be replaced, and the movement should be serviced- lubricants don't last that long in mechanical watches, even if it's just been sitting.

As to the band originally attached, I'd guess a bracelet, but you can do some internet searches to see what pops up most often, maybe peruse the archived catalog scans we have here: http://www.thewatchsite.com/index.php/topic,157.0.html

As to worth, monetarily you probably won't get out of it what you put into it for a proper service, but then again, where can you get another watch (or any item for that matter) that has been with you for almost 30 years?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Noah,

Thank you so much for the information you provided. 1971 feel right regarding the age.

Would it be worthwhile to send it into Seiko NJ for the crystal and cleaning and is there a chance they too will not have the crystal. When I called them, they said the watch was discontinued and they could not tell me if they had the crystal in stock!?

Can you reccomend a good alternative to Seiko NJ that would know in advance if they had the parts I am aware I need?

Thanks again
Don
 

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Hi Don,
I do not know Coserv's abilities with vintage models that are discontinued- I just don't know what they have left in stock parts wise either for movements or cases. I would recommend you search out a local watchmaker who you can talk face to face with, www.awci.com has a referral directory for watchmakers in your area. Otherwise there are a few watchmakers other forum members have used over the years- they may be able to offer suggestions. As far as finding some one who will say for sure they have the necessary parts in stock- watch repair doesn't always work that way- the best estimates come from physically inspecting the watch at length, and even then things can arise during servicing that are unforeseen. Patience is required when restoring a watch for which parts have been long-discontinued.
 

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You would be far better off sending it to someone who has experience working on vintage Seikos. I (and others) have had disappointing experiences with sending vintage watches to COSERV.
 
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