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bparker170 said:
that's a really great offer,i'm trying to track a screw extractor down in the uk to fit,could you remember what size extractor you used i would say anything larger than 2mm would be too big?you can get them easily at 3mm or above.some optical equipment suppliers sell them in small sizes this evening i've ordered one to try.
I'd try 2 ton epoxy as Barry suggests before the screw extractor. It's much less invasive. Getting a screw extractor to work often involves drilling into the screw, which could go badly wrong. But if the epoxy grips, then its as good as the extractor. If it doesn't grip, then you clean the residue away. But 2 ton epoxy is amazing stuff. I've used it to replace threads that had stripped from a bicycle crank, the ones that hold the pedal. It held permanently - and that's a tough job; the force that goes through those cranks is quite something. (Cranks are the hardest part of a bicycle to manufacture, apparently. I'm a mine of fascinating information like that.)

Also:

- I'd lubricate the screw hole with most penetrating lube I could find (I felt dirty saying that) letting it drip slowly into the hole well in advance (ditto)

- I'd use a very high quality allen key with the other screws. My experience of bicycle repair taught me never to use a hex key that wasn't made of silicon hardened steel, especially in the smallest sizes. The softer the key, the more likely you are to have a disaster.
 

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Good luck!

..There is another trick I've known people use for removing stubborn screws - heat the thing that the screw is in. Obviously you'd have to take the mech out first. And even then I'd think the heating should be very gentle, if you were to try this trick at all. Rather than, say, the blow torch that I have known people use in bicycle repair...
 
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