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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's a Father to do on Father's Day? Well, since the kid's and grand kid's live 1000's of miles away and won't be able to visit I'll most likely build a watch as a way to have a nice peaceful afternoon.

What's in the works? Funny you should ask.......:)

I've got a nice Mod in mind utilizing a MM conversion case.

Disclaimer: No Original Seiko watch will be harmed during the course of this build and furthermore, No TVP's will be utilized..........
475148

More to follow as the build commences............
 

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Administrator
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Happy fathers day to all, today is one of those days having five kids is quite pleasant :)

This is what I made with my Seikomods MM style case, look forward to seeing yours Tom.

475151
 

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Special Member
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445 Posts
Tom, Happy Father's Day! Spending the day with my kids! I can't wait to see your mod! I always enjoy your posts and learn something new! Have a Great Day! Happy Father's Dad to everyone!

Steve
 

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Indeed, happy Father’s Day gents!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Craftsman
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3,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Following Jon's lead with his orange dialed SRP Mod I decided to use an orange dial in my MM Mod. Looks like John also had been there done that.........:)

As the afternoon progressed I made progress on my project. I had chosen an Orange SRPD dial which is somewhat different then the other orange dials were accustomed to from Seiko. This dial is somewhat iridescent and brighter then the others. It's hard to photograph but I did my best in the final photo to capture the brightness of the orange. It's an original orphaned dial I picked up a couple of weeks ago. In the madness of reproduction parts how do I know it's original? There's no date code on the back but there is a way to tell which won't be disclosed publicly for obvious reasons. The build also consists of the MM conversion case, 4R36 movement with Kanji day wheel, CT chapter ring, CT double dome sapphire crystal, CT signed crown, and a CT MM style bezel. I'll hold off on going using the MM bezel for the time being and go with an SKX bezel because I'm short the correct insert and don't want to chance damaging the original SKX insert transferring it over to the MM style bezel. I have some CT MM style hands but they are in silver. I also had a set of harold's MM style hands in gold so decided to go with them to complement the bezel insert.

This is a Crystaltimes SKX to MM conversion case. Basically it's a MM style one piece case that will accept SKX components like movements, chapter rings, dials, and crystals.
475171


First we prepare the implant movement by installing the dial and hands.
Hour hand:
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Minute hand:
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Second hand:
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Then the case is prepared for the movement. The movement ring goes in first:
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Then the movement and chapter ring:
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This build is different then others in that there is a crystal retaining ring that screws into the case. I chose to install the crystal in the ring before screwing it down in the case. With a domed crystal this is easier said then done. Third times a charm and the crystal is seated evenly.
475178


Next it's time to trim the stem so it's over to the stem trimming area of my work shop. I used to snip off the stems and then file them to a more accurate length. This worked fine but it had some drawbacks. First, when a stem is snipped the threads are disturbed and you have to guestimate the length and calculate how much filing you'll need to do to overcome the damaged threads while still maintaining the correct length. Rather time consuming to say the least. I decided to incorporate a Dremel tool in a holding fixture to act as a cutoff saw. The stem is inserted in a pin vice and then cut on the cut off wheel. It works great with no thread damage whatsoever. Believe it or not I actually eyeballed a 6139 stem, cut, ground the end on the side of the wheel, installed the crown to find it was a perfect fit on the first try. That's not likely to happen a second time so I've started to mark the first initial cut to avoid a mishap.
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Next we install the stem + crown, check the length + fit, and if all is well install the screw in crystal retaining ring.
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Finally we install the bezel in another press I use exclusively for bezels.
475181
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The rest is history and my Father's Day gift to myself is complete...........:)
475182


Now the search begins for the perfect strap or bracelet............
 

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Special Member
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Certainly the final result is so nice and there is so much demand for an orange dial MM when can we expect to see SEIKO turn out an SPB or SLA using an orange dial ? You've paved the way !

The best part of this thread for me was learning of your stem trimming station and the dremel technique. How many hours have we all cut and filed and re-cut and re-filed our stems? Wonderful solution Tom.
 

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Craftsman
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3,989 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The best part of this thread for me was learning of your stem trimming station and the dremel technique. How many hours have we all cut and filed and re-cut and re-filed our stems? Wonderful solution Tom.
Thanks Jon! I'm always looking for a better solution to accomplish some of the common tasks we encounter restoring or building watches. I really got motivated after attempting another approach which quickly ruined (2) 6139 stems on a watch I was restoring. Those stems aren't so easy to come by and I kept thinking there has got to be a better way. This setup is the ticket. It turns a 20 or 30 minute job into a 5 minute job. It's more accurate and there is no thread damage.
 

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I am surprised by @Grammarofdesign surprise ;) , I ignore the fact that every professional watchmaker is equipped with all kinds of lathes, grinders, etc.
I have been using this method myself for years for semi-amateur-professional repairs. The only "problem" is to choose the right abrasive disc (grain) and engine speed, so as not to damage or tear the element apart (overheating).
Perhaps the reason for surprise is that @Grammarofdesign ignores many users and elementary knowledge eludes him.
 
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