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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A quick question for those who are familiar with the Seiko 6R15 movement: how does one know when to stop handwinding? Unlike some of my Swiss mechanical watches, the Seiko 6R15 watches do not seem to emit the clicking sound when the overwinding protection kicks in.

I also cannot find any information on what setting I should set my winders for this movement (other than, obviously, bi-directional).
 

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^-^ welcome to the forums

That is a good question as I have a SARB with this movement and I've wondered myself. When in rotation and not being worn I give it ~40 good turns...it runs off that for 2 solid days. I know it has over-wind protection, but in the form of what I do not know! Someone movement guru will visit soon I'm sure and set us straight. Have fun here!
 

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I have a Spirit w 6R15 movement. I also have ALS, so my arms stopped working a while ago. Therefore my nurses or kids wind the crown ten turns every morning and night. With this small effort, the accuracy is extremely good!

:))
 

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All modern automatic movements allow the winding mechanism to slip once you've reached a full wind. I don't think that most make any particular sound when this happens. In short, you can't overwind an automatic. just give the watch a good wind (thirty manual turns should suffice) to get it going with a decent reserve. wearing the watch will finish the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Most of my Swiss mechanical watches do make a "click" sound every full turn once the mainspring is fully wound. My TAG-Heuer Monaco, for example, takes about 80 handwinds (from nearly completely unwound) and then I can hear this sound every full turn thereafter.

By the way, this particular Monaco suffered from too much overwinding at one point. Yes, the overwind protection mechanism did protect the watch up to a point, but once the lubrication started to congeal a bit, the overwinding began to grind the mainspring, which eventually broke under stress.

So I am hoping to avoid that with the Seikos I recently purchased even if they are just beaters since I don't wear them daily.
 

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I have 2 6r15 Seiko SARBs and I only use the hand winding to get the movement going from a complete stand still. After that, I just slip the watch on my wrist and let the rotor do the rest. I don't like to overuse the hand winding crown function if I don't have to. The 6r15s, as most Seiko mechanical calibers with hand wind feature, have over winding prevention. This also includes my Spring Drive Seiko. You are not going to hurt the movement if you over do it, but then again, why?
 

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My Tissot Seastar 1000 (ETA 2824) makes a click when it starts to slip once it's fully wound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So do you reset your watches everytime you wear them?

I don't have enough winders for all of my mechanical watches. I have to handwind some of them if I am to keep the time running on all of them.
 

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IndiaLimaDelta said:
So do you reset your watches everytime you wear them?

I don't have enough winders for all of my mechanical watches. I have to handwind some of them if I am to keep the time running on all of them.

I don't like winders. They put wear on the movement. Instead, I let the watches come to a stop and then reset as necessary. Love the little "ritual" that evolves from it.
 

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There is essentially a clutch mechanism that disengages after a certain tension is reached. Like everything mechanical it can break resulting in overwinding. However, this is far less likely with the rotor as the source than the stem. That's why I wind enough to get the mechanism going via stem and then let movement via the rotor finish the task. With limited mobility from ALS or similar winding 10-15 twice a day should keep a descent reserve in place and keep a relatively constant tension and good accuracy.
 

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I agree. I give mine 20 twists of the crown and that is fine to keep it running for the day off the wrist.

I guess you could do a little experiment. Start with a dead watch. Set the time to something memorable. Give it some number of winds and see how long it lasts. Hmmm. Maybe I'll do this myself.
 

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I did this John....about 40 nice full turns keeps my watch going ~48 hours

I only do this when I want to keep it going when I'm not wearing it.
 

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jbdan said:
I did this John....about 40 nice full turns keeps my watch going ~48 hours

I only do this when I want to keep it going when I'm not wearing it.
Good to know...40 turns is just about a full wind. I guess 10-20 is fine for a daily wind.
 

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jbdan said:
I did this John....about 40 nice full turns keeps my watch going ~48 hours

I only do this when I want to keep it going when I'm not wearing it.
Hmm, that's not too shabby. I always wondered how many times you had to wind from a stop to get a full reserve.
 

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UpstandingCitizen said:
Hmm, that's not too shabby. I always wondered how many times you had to wind from a stop to get a full reserve.
Takes ~40 with the Omega as well, but it's PR holds up at about 44 hrs and there is a nice tick when it gets there via winding.

These are long slow sweeping winds...I'm sure it would be many more if your a quick or "novice" winder ;D I learnt' on the Speedy !
 

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IndiaLimaDelta said:
A quick question for those who are familiar with the Seiko 6R15 movement: how does one know when to stop handwinding? Unlike some of my Swiss mechanical watches, the Seiko 6R15 watches do not seem to emit the clicking sound when the overwinding protection kicks in.

I also cannot find any information on what setting I should set my winders for this movement (other than, obviously, bi-directional).
I would stop handwinding as soon as the movement starts running. Arm movement or the motion of your watch winder will wind the mainspring.
 

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My daily is an Air diver 200m- i.e. Sumo. If I'm going with another watch that day, I just give it a couple winds and leave it on the dresser so I don't have to set it again the next morning. I don't really count the winds, but I'd guess maybe 2 or 3. I've never had it stop on me. Hope that's of use.
 

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Guys, your arm movement winds the spring exactly as the crown does, the only difference is that the crown winds directly and doesn't need the balance weight (is that the right term?). So if the system has a clutch, ie, the winding system will start to slip once the spring is fully wound be it through the crown or from the movement of the balance, you can't over wind the spring.
So why is everybody so touchy about using the crown
?
 

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LUW said:
Guys, your arm movement winds the spring exactly as the crown does, the only difference is that the crown winds directly and doesn't need the balance weight (is that the right term?). So if the system has a clutch, ie, the winding system will start to slip once the spring is fully wound be it through the crown or from the movement of the balance, you can't over wind the spring.
So why is everybody so touchy about using the crown ?
[/quote]

I don't think anyone is touchy about using the crown. At least with me the issue is more of why bother fully winding with the crown. If you get a decent reserve with 20-30 winds, I see no practical reason in continuing to hand wind and trying to guess when you've reached a full wind, when the rotor WILL finish the job anyway.
 
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