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Discussion Starter #1
Here is a Citizen Citizen Challenge Golf that I recently picked up from Japan.



As you can see the crown for this clearly sits out from the body.



This is to allow the wearer to push the crown to advance the counter at 12 'oclock.



The counter changes between +18 and -2 to allow you to keep a track of your score during a round of golf.



This came with the original bracelet and it is an extremely light alloy.

I also have the similar round dial Challenge Golf model. Both watches are from 1973.

 

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Nice buy - and on the original bracelet :)

Here's yours in the 'Citizen Times' of October 1972 (when they were first released) - on the alternative white leather:



They are high beat and cost the same as the 8110 chronographs at the time (JPY23000).

Mine say hi!:



Stephen
 

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Wow those are so cool. I want one !

I have a beater 7N39 Seiko in titanium as my golfing watch for its light weight and durability.
 

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Golf can even be a challenge to watch!

Pretty cool, akable! :cheer:


Golf can even be a challenge to watch! :rolleyes:


(Watch... See what I did there?) :p


- Thomas
 

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I get that you push in the crown to register how many shots over par you do on a hole, but how do you register shots under par? Some of us achieve birdies (occasionally!).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The score indicator indicates under par when the score is red and over par when the score is blue you are over par.

The score indicator just cycles through the numbers, so if you do get a score under par for a hole you will likely have to press the crown a few times to drop the score.
 

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I think I've found some more info on how the scoring works:

"The watch has a counter at 12, that if you depress the crown when the watch is upright (12 on top), the counter will subtract the numbers by 1. If you turn the watch upside down, (with 12 at bottom), and depress the crown, the counter will add 1 to the score.
The score wheel will show this (blue wheel) 0 - 18, (red wheel) 1 & 2. "

(Quote from an old FS post.)

So this is how I think it works:

1.To avoid dislocating your elbow every time you score over par, you have to take the watch off before starting your round. [I would recommend this anyway, despite what some others might say and irrespective of what type of movement it has.]

2. If you shoot a par on the first hole, you need do nothing except write your score (and your opponent's) on your score card.

3. If you shoot under par on the first hole, you write down your scores but before hitting off the next tee you ostentatiously hold your watch the right way up and press in the crown -- once for a birdie, twice for an eagle (don't laugh, it CAN happen when all the planets are aligned). When your opponent asks you what the hell you're doing, just smile and breezily say you find this the easiest way to keep a check on all your sub-par holes.

4. If you shoot over par on the hole, write down your score then wait until your opponent's back is turned before sneakily turning the watch upside down and surreptitiously pressing the crown the required number of presses.

5. Carry on like this for the rest of the round.

Whilst your score will always be available from your score card, the watch counter will give you an instantaneous real-time read-out of how you're faring relative to par at any point of the game, without having to do any pesky adding-up.

As a bonus, you can use the watch to time the prescribed 5 minutes allowed for your opponent to look for his ball, whilst you remain standing with it under your foot. All's fair in love and golf! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the quick description, it is very clear now.

I was not aware of the inversion of the watch to make the counter go the opposite direction.

I would not think that you would need to remove the watch from your wrist to operate. If you just rotate your wrist to have the watch facing away from you (12 o'clock down), you can still easily depress the crown.

I do think that a mechanical watch and golf generally do not mix but I can see how this would have been useful.

I now just need to find that white leather band for my round version.
 
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