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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A chap at work asked me to change the battery in his wifes watch that had been dead in a drawer for some years.

The press back was easy to remove with a case knife, but whoever had been in there before obviously used the wrong tool




and not only had they marked the case, but I'm certain they damaged the coil at the same time




you can just make out the wire (bent towards the right) that should be attached at the left.

So, has anyone had any success fixing a coil wire that has been snapped at the point it would normally attach?

The only thing I can think of involves a soldering iron but I'm not sure if the heat will melt the wire?
 

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That's a tricky one. FYI, that circuit is still available as a movement complete for around US$40, might be the quickest, easiest, most reliable fix.
 

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Grobet Circuit maker will do this job just fine. Product is made by Permatex and a similar product is available at auto supply vendors...used to repair contacts in heating elements in glass. You paint it on, let it dry and you are done. Soft solder is likely to make you very sad...
Regards, BG
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Grobet Circuit maker will do this job just fine. Product is made by Permatex and a similar product is available at auto supply vendors...used to repair contacts in heating elements in glass. You paint it on, let it dry and you are done. Soft solder is likely to make you very sad...
Regards, BG
As I said above, I've decided to buy a new movement (only £12) but for future reference could you explain how this product would work in the situation I've got.

The wire has been broken at the point it joints the PCB. There is no slack in the wire.

The circuit has some kind of resin over the pad where the wire needs to connect. I guess I would carefully scrape the resin off without removing the gold contact.

I assume the copper wire has some coating on it - does this need scraping off?

Then do I just paint the 'Circuit Maker' onto the pad and also on the end of the wire and then just push the wire towards the pad and when it dries it completes the circuit?
 

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That product made by ...Permatex is used on electrical parts in Automotive shops. Alternator and Generator shop use it also. It can be used on Ignitions, and also Starters and all kinds of products. It is conductive and will allow the power current to work. After you use it you can coat it with
The Varnish or Shellac coatings also. Many use it for Remote Control Model making and it is very popular with the kids in making those robots for competition.
It can be used for Computer repairs, Radios, and a whole lot of other uses.
Also make sure you clean the end of the wire of the coating, but also make sure it is not.....
( Exposed Bare after it is done in any area to drain power or cause a short. )
 

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Place the wire back close to the point of breakage. Put join the points with a drop of circuit mender. The material will conduct from break point to break point (which will have no coating). Material also will repair most superficial coil damage (ie. slipped screwdriver)...it will not repair internal damage or corrosive damage. I've used acetone or OneDip as a solvent to thin, if necessary. Regards, BG
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Place the wire back close to the point of breakage. Put join the points with a drop of circuit mender. The material will conduct from break point to break point (which will have no coating). Material also will repair most superficial coil damage (ie. slipped screwdriver)...it will not repair internal damage or corrosive damage. I've used acetone or OneDip as a solvent to thin, if necessary. Regards, BG
thanks very much.
 

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Welcome. My first preference is an unmolested coil...but when these are unavailable, the patch may be the only alternative. Regards, BG
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Can I ask where you found the movement for £12? I'm down to my last stock one and that's a good price for re-stocking!

Unfortunately the movement I ordered is the wrong one :(

It's too big. Still, only £12 and I'll have to switch to my backup plan.

I've cleaned the resin / glue from the contact and the wire just reaches the edge, but doesn't really overlap.




So, I now need to order some conductive paint / glue and hope that it works (which from the advice above sounds like it will).
 

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Unfortunately the movement I ordered is the wrong one :(
...
I've cleaned the resin / glue from the contact and the wire just reaches the edge, but doesn't really overlap.
Interesting, did the original movement not have an ETA caliber number engraved, such as 956.112? In any case, you might try unwrapping the coil wire one turn to give enough excess to make good contact with the circuit pad, and give you the ability to strip away the wire insulation on the end first.

Some unsolicited advice when doing work for others (even if for free)- if your reputation depends upon the repair, I've found it preferable to choose the route (method of repair) that is most likely to guarantee success, provided you do your side of the work well (hand clearance, sealing the case, inside free of dirt/lint, etc.). If I was an expert on repairing broken cool wires, then I might feel differently, but as it is I'd take the new movement option any day of the week for overall reliability and less likelihood of a come-back. Have you tested the rest of the movement to know it is in good order and does not need to be serviced also?
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yep - the movement caliber is there:




but it was hidden by the dial spacer, and not having worked on one of these before I didn't find it until after I'd ordered!!

I did think about unwrapping one turn, once I'd removed the circuit and coil, but the varnish that the coil is painted with has effectively glued the strands in place and I think if I tried to separate the strand it would probably snap off.

So, for now I'm going for the repair option.
 

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Unfortunately the movement I ordered is the wrong one :(

It's too big. Still, only £12 and I'll have to switch to my backup plan.

I've cleaned the resin / glue from the contact and the wire just reaches the edge, but doesn't really overlap....

...So, I now need to order some conductive paint / glue and hope that it works (which from the advice above sounds like it will).
This is what we use...don't know where to find it in the UK:
http://b2bprofessionaltools.com/vicima.html

It is viscous enough that it will bridge the gap.

This will probably work just fine, as well. I'd test it on a scrap movement first, though:
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/conductive-adhesives/1015621/

Note: as Noah said, first choice is replacing with the correct circuit/coil/or movement, if available. That said, I've never had a Grobet "repaired" coil come back...and I don't attempt to repair coils that have suffered oxidative corrosion (such as from spilled battery contents). Regards, BG
 

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Was the movement you ordered a 955.xxx instead of a 956.xxx? They look pretty similar.

If the repair doesn't work I'm pretty sure I still have some good 956 circuits in stock but, as Riley says, unless you're confident about the mechanical side (or your ability to service it), a complete movement swap is probably the best bet.
 

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Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I ordered a 956.412. It looked very similar, but of course when it arrived and I compared them like for like there were subtle differences that I really should have spotted.

I'm very confident that if I needed to I could service the movement. But, it looks pretty clean so I'm hoping it will work correctly once I can get power to the coil.

If it doesn't I might be interested in a circuit if you have the correct one.

Thanks.
 

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I ordered a 956.412. It looked very similar, but of course when it arrived and I compared them like for like there were subtle differences that I really should have spotted.

I'm very confident that if I needed to I could service the movement. But, it looks pretty clean so I'm hoping it will work correctly once I can get power to the coil.

If it doesn't I might be interested in a circuit if you have the correct one.

Thanks.
956.412 circuit and coil should interchange with 956.112, have you tried swapping them?
I believe the difference between 412 and 112 is in the size and/or thickness of the mainplate, the wheel train and electronics should be identical.
 
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