The Watch Site banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a few months back, I managed to grab a 6139 that was a bit worse for wear. I wasn't too sure what to expect, but I had mostly bought it in hopes that I could use the movement for another 6139 that I have that was given to me by my mother in law. I figured it could provide a decent learning experience, if nothing else, as I had worked on a few 7002 and 7S26 based watches in the past.

A couple of the seller's photos:





Anyhow, when the watch arrived, I was pleasantly surprised to see that it had the original bracelet on it, although the end-link was damaged and was hanging on by one link. The pictures hid the reason for the low price: someone had gone at the old crystal with what appeared to be an axe or a harpoon in an attempt to get the crystal out -- failing miserably.

So the watch provided not only an opportunity to learn disassembly and reassembly, but also some case refinishing. I figured there was no better way to learn than to dig right in. I ordered a new crystal for it, new seals from Jonathan, and applied some elbow grease to the case.

This is the end result. I just realized that the tachymeter ring is crooked, so I've got to get back in there and re-align it, but other than that, I am over the moon with how it came out. It isn't perfect, but it's something I'm proud to say I brought back to life!







I would be remiss if I failed to thank Jonathan for the superb gaskets, Mike (pollyc) for the 6139 amateur guide, and the entire SCWF community for the guidance. Thank you all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
Congratulations!

You've done an excellent job in restoring your chrono. to it's original appearance; especially your very nice case work.
John
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
33,575 Posts
Great result and that now looks superb and i agree thats a good ser # :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,578 Posts
That's a stunning result for a first attempt - very well done indeed. What tools / techniques did you use on the case? The bezel, case and case back all look as good as new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After I received a few inquiries, I figured I'd put together a sort of photo pictorial of what I did to refinish the case, rather than trying to describe it verbally. Just a note, I got all my parts from Home Depot; I didn't find equivalent parts at Lowes.

PARTS LIST
2 - 1-1/4" rubber washers (3/8" hole)
2 - 1-1/4" fender washers (ABJ size) (3/8" hole)
1 - #12 Bolt & Nut (the bolt needs to be as close to the 3/8" hole as possible)
220 grit sandpaper
500 grit sandpaper
600 grit sandpaper





Step 1
Take the bolt and slip the fender washer first, then a rubber washer. It's imperative that the hole in the washers and the bolt are all the same size, so that the case is perfectly centered as it spins.



Step 2
Next, place the watch case facing the rubber washer, then attach the other washer behind it. You can also place the other rubber washer between the case and the washer to ensure no metal-to-metal contact.



Step 3
Tighten the end of the bolt into the drill, like so:



Step 4
Cut strips of sandpaper to attach around a 3/8" square dowel. You can also use popsicle sticks or anything similar, you just need to be able to hold the sandpaper flat against the case.



Step 5
While spinning the drill on LOW SPEED, hold the sandpaper flat against the watch case. You don't have to apply a lot of pressure, or you may end up removing more material than necessary.


I put a little video together so you can see what the process looks like in action. Ideally, you'd want to hold the sandpaper steady, not with the up and down motion I appear to be applying. I was worried my camera was going to jump to its death, so I wasn't as steady as I'd be if I were refinishing a case I planned to use.

http://flic.kr/p/fDRjgD

This is the exact process I did on my 6139 case to achieve the finish above. Just take it very slowly. Just for clarification, I started with the 220 because my case had some pretty substantial gouges in it. I found that leaving the case in the drill was helpful for positioning it in a way to allow sanding of the sides of the case and lugs. After I used the 220 grit and saw no more imperfections, I used the 500 grit to smooth it all out.

I hope that helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,771 Posts
beautiful watch...great job
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top