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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well I got this in a large watch lot and seller thought it was some stop watch
So I never gave it a second thought
But this was made in WW2 for the allies
They were used I am told for bomber runs
This watch which is huge for that time and very large in size about 2" round or 50.8mm and is very heavy
It has what looks like a nickel finish and a plastic crystal which has some very small crack up near the top by the winder/stop button
It seems to run very well and resets good too
Dial is flat black and hands are a off white color as well as the markings on the dial
There is stampings/ markings on back which are very faint and what also looks like initials on the back JRP at the top
There is a serial number on it too
23295 ...
The case back is two piece hinged and I am not sure how to close it as it seems very tight
So I will pack it well when I ship it
it has a logo inside and very hard to see that says cased and timed by Elgin National watch co. As they assembled the watches and timed them for accuracy
Star Watch Company logo stamped the center of it as they made the case I am told 5697036
almost forgot to mention this
these watches run super fast and are noisy as u can hear them
they were called Jitterbug
Well here are some pics
See what u think
I am open to offers as I would like this to go to someone who will appreciate it
Prices are all over the place on these from the cheap to hundreds of dollars
I would like to see a fair price out of this but willing to work with anyone who will appreciate it
Stay safe out there

I will ship worldwide at Your Costs too
I might even be open to interesting trades too

I am asking 100 USD shipped Conus

Stay safe out there
God Bless,John
i have found some info online more about these and will add it here
and here is the whole story very cool info
LESSONS IN WRISTORY: A-8 GROUND SPEED STOPWATCH
BY SHANE GRIFFIN
LESSONS IN WRISTORY
MAY 23, 2014

Waltham A-8



The best way to describe the market for military watches is probably, “insane”. Collectors love the stories and the purpose-built functionality, and will gladly pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on them. So, as you can imagine, information for military watches isn’t exactly in a shortage. Oddly enough, one of the most mass produced issued watches has a surprising lack coverage, and it’s the A-8 Ground Speed Stopwatch.

Several hundred thousand A-8 stopwatches were made over roughly a decade starting in 1940. Elgin and Waltham were the primary manufacturers during wartime, produced under Army Air Corps Specification 94-27749. Post-war, the spec was re-written as MIL-W-6510 when Aristo, Leonidas, and Federal Television Corp got in on the action.

Produced with 9 or 15-jewel hand-wound movements, the A-8 was designed for navigators to make ground speed calculations while in the air. It featured a black dial and white markings. The outer ring of the dial counted up to 10 seconds and the inner dial located at the standard 12:00 position counted up to 10 minutes of the 10-second revolutions. The A-8 was affectionately known as the ‘jitterbug’ because of the loud and fast ticking of the (very tiny) balance. What’s fast, you ask? 144,000 beats per hour is fast – four times as fast as Zenith’s high-beat El Primero.

Prior to the days of GPS and advanced radar systems, cockpit air speed instruments only told part of the story. For example, let’s say your air speed indicator is reading 200 knots, and there’s a headwind of 50 knots – well, your ground speed is only 150 knots. Since the instrument can only read the speed of the air in which the plane is flying, understanding how far you’ve traveled is an unknown variable.

At lower altitudes, where landmarks are easily identifiable from the cockpit, navigators could use their A-8 to mark time from point to point with the plane’s shadow. For another example, the navigator could pick out two landmarks, five miles apart. As the plane passes the first landmark, he would engage the stopwatch. One minute later, the nav stops the watch as the second landmark flies by. With a quick calculation, the navigator knows the plane is flying at 260 knots. At this point, the air speed indicator readout can actually help give the crew an understanding of what kind of wind they’re flying in.

Bubble Sextant
Bubble Sextant
At higher altitudes, using landmarks becomes very difficult. What the navigators did was use abubble sextant and navigational charts to help with plotting their approximate location. Through averaging multiple sextant readings with stopwatch timings, navigators could calculate ground speed with a fair amount of accuracy.

One of the most frustrating things about collecting military timepieces is the high cost. But, as luck would have it, the A-8 is very reasonable. They pop up on eBay occasionally, and don’t be surprised if they’re selling for $100 or less. For a primo example with original box and documentation, you can obviously expect to pay more. It’ll likely be impossible to tell if it was used in a bomber, cargo, or transport aircraft, but for the price, it’s hard to beat. If you’re looking to get into the military watch game, the A-8 is a fantastic way to start.







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Discussion Starter #2
Tuesday Bump
Stay safe out there
God Bless,John

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Well I got this in a large watch lot and seller thought it was some stop watch
So I never gave it a second thought
But this was made in WW2 for the allies
They were used I am told for bomber runs
This watch which is huge for that time and very large in size about 2" round or 50.8mm and is very heavy
It has what looks like a nickel finish and a plastic crystal which has some very small crack up near the top by the winder/stop button
It seems to run very well and resets good too
Dial is flat black and hands are a off white color as well as the markings on the dial
There is stampings/ markings on back which are very faint and what also looks like initials on the back JRP at the top
There is a serial number on it too
23295 ...
The case back is two piece hinged and I am not sure how to close it as it seems very tight
So I will pack it well when I ship it
it has a logo inside and very hard to see that says cased and timed by Elgin National watch co. As they assembled the watches and timed them for accuracy
Star Watch Company logo stamped the center of it as they made the case I am told 5697036
almost forgot to mention this
these watches run super fast and are noisy as u can hear them
they were called Jitterbug
Well here are some pics
See what u think
I am open to offers as I would like this to go to someone who will appreciate it
Prices are all over the place on these from the cheap to hundreds of dollars
I would like to see a fair price out of this but willing to work with anyone who will appreciate it
Stay safe out there

I will ship worldwide at Your Costs too
I might even be open to interesting trades too

I am asking 100 USD shipped Conus

Stay safe out there
God Bless,John
i have found some info online more about these and will add it here

The best way to describe the market for military watches is probably, “insane”. Collectors love the stories and the purpose-built functionality, and will gladly pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on them. So, as you can imagine, information for military watches isn’t exactly in a shortage. Oddly enough, one of the most mass produced issued watches has a surprising lack coverage, and it’s the A-8 Ground Speed Stopwatch.

Several hundred thousand A-8 stopwatches were made over roughly a decade starting in 1940. Elgin and Waltham were the primary manufacturers during wartime, produced under Army Air Corps Specification 94-27749. Post-war, the spec was re-written as MIL-W-6510 when Aristo, Leonidas, and Federal Television Corp got in on the action.

Produced with 9 or 15-jewel hand-wound movements, the A-8 was designed for navigators to make ground speed calculations while in the air. It featured a black dial and white markings. The outer ring of the dial counted up to 10 seconds and the inner dial located at the standard 12:00 position counted up to 10 minutes of the 10-second revolutions. The A-8 was affectionately known as the ‘jitterbug’ because of the loud and fast ticking of the (very tiny) balance. What’s fast, you ask? 144,000 beats per hour is fast – four times as fast as Zenith’s high-beat El Primero.

Prior to the days of GPS and advanced radar systems, cockpit air speed instruments only told part of the story. For example, let’s say your air speed indicator is reading 200 knots, and there’s a headwind of 50 knots – well, your ground speed is only 150 knots. Since the instrument can only read the speed of the air in which the plane is flying, understanding how far you’ve traveled is an unknown variable.

At lower altitudes, where landmarks are easily identifiable from the cockpit, navigators could use their A-8 to mark time from point to point with the plane’s shadow. For another example, the navigator could pick out two landmarks, five miles apart. As the plane passes the first landmark, he would engage the stopwatch. One minute later, the nav stops the watch as the second landmark flies by. With a quick calculation, the navigator knows the plane is flying at 260 knots. At this point, the air speed indicator readout can actually help give the crew an understanding of what kind of wind they’re flying in.

Bubble Sextant
Bubble Sextant
At higher altitudes, using landmarks becomes very difficult. What the navigators did was use abubble sextant and navigational charts to help with plotting their approximate location. Through averaging multiple sextant readings with stopwatch timings, navigators could calculate ground speed with a fair amount of accuracy.

One of the most frustrating things about collecting military timepieces is the high cost. But, as luck would have it, the A-8 is very reasonable. They pop up on eBay occasionally, and don’t be surprised if they’re selling for $100 or less. For a primo example with original box and documentation, you can obviously expect to pay more. It’ll likely be impossible to tell if it was used in a bomber, cargo, or transport aircraft, but for the price, it’s hard to beat. If you’re looking to get into the military watch game, the A-8 is a fantastic way to start.







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I'd put money on that being radium lumed John....
 

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When borrowing that much research, it would be polite to the original author to cite their work. Pretty please.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
well sorry about that my friend
i went back and added it
i thought i copied the whole page
and i added a link to the page too
God Bless,John
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'd put money on that being radium lumed John....
Well thank you my dear friend
I did not even think about that
Great point
God Bless,John
I never even looked it at other than being off white paint

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Discussion Starter #7
Monday Bump
No reasonable offers refused
Stay safe out there
God Bless,John

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Discussion Starter #8
Monday Bump
I might be interested in trades
Stay safe out there
God Bless,John

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Discussion Starter #9
Sunday Bump
Stay safe out there
God Bless,John

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