The Watch Site banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I was reading the news today and a report was in there about a gentleman that just set the world record for scuba depth, 1066 feet. The endeavor took him 14 hours and 9 tanks to accomplish. That depth is 324 meters.

Coincidentally I read this while wearing my 600m 7549-7009 diver, which probably hasn't been in more than 10ft of water since I first strapped it on. I don't know, it gave me a chuckle that we all seem to love capabilities like this (deeper depth rating, etc...) but even the most extreme divers in the world apparently barely have a need for a watch capable of 300 meters. I get that a serious diver would have a dive computer, not a Seiko wrist watch (at least as primary support).

It just caused me to chuckle and ask aloud, why is it (some of us, me, I assume others) pursue these capabilities we'll only ever use 10% of? Maybe the same reason cars exist that can go 240 miles per hour, but only for 51 miles (Bugatti Veyron).

Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,538 Posts
I for one think it would be very usefull to know the exact time my head imploded if I were ever to find myself at such a great depth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
There is an impression (true or false) that the deeper rating is equivalent to better or more robust watch. More reliable even... I even have that opinion/idea even though it might not be totally correct for every watch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I do dive with my divers, and I give them a pressure service every now and then ... No 300m diving though.

Still, I wonder, if you dive to 40m, is a 600m diver "better" than a 200m since you're more on "the safe side"? Can you assume the overall design is better? Or is a rubber gasket always a rubber gasket and it will eventually fail regardless the depht rating?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,881 Posts
Don't know to much about that but I have been using a
Seiko SKX 173 for a very long time and it is robust enough far
as I can see. Friend has a (Dive Computer) and it always gets in his way when diving or Spear Fishing. He gets really frustrated with it too
and says why the heck did I buy this blasted thing when you guys just
use those Seiko watchs.

I keep telling him, we are not try to dive the San Andrea Trench.:57:

Now he uses a SKX 173 I gave him and he is very satisfied with it.
He called me one day and said lets go diving, and he hands me the Computer and says. You collector of all this kind off stuff, I said well
I did not collect one like that yet.
He then tells me it's a pain in the arse.
So I said you sure and I said thank you very much. Its sitting in the original box, and not doing anything on my shelf.
Well another .... " Free Toy to play with ".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
I do dive with my divers, and I give them a pressure service every now and then ... No 300m diving though.

Still, I wonder, if you dive to 40m, is a 600m diver "better" than a 200m since you're more on "the safe side"? Can you assume the overall design is better? Or is a rubber gasket always a rubber gasket and it will eventually fail regardless the depht rating?
It's just as likely that a case would implode/distort to such an extent that the seal would fail.
Seals are designed to work harder at higher pressures, it's often the cross sectional shape which determines the efficacy of the seal rather than just the material itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
So, I was reading the news today and a report was in there about a gentleman that just set the world record for scuba depth, 1066 feet. The endeavor took him 14 hours and 9 tanks to accomplish. That depth is 324 meters.

Coincidentally I read this while wearing my 600m 7549-7009 diver, which probably hasn't been in more than 10ft of water since I first strapped it on. I don't know, it gave me a chuckle that we all seem to love capabilities like this (deeper depth rating, etc...) but even the most extreme divers in the world apparently barely have a need for a watch capable of 300 meters. I get that a serious diver would have a dive computer, not a Seiko wrist watch (at least as primary support).

It just caused me to chuckle and ask aloud, why is it (some of us, me, I assume others) pursue these capabilities we'll only ever use 10% of? Maybe the same reason cars exist that can go 240 miles per hour, but only for 51 miles (Bugatti Veyron).

Thoughts?
The tri-mix record seems to be 500 plus metres, and the atmospheric suit is 700m - so I'd say the 600m/1000m watches are warranted ( if only as back up watches)
But, as you said- just for a fraction of a percent of divers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
He used a CX Swiss Military 20,000. This was given to him by the company. And he used more than 9 tanks. 90 were used in totality for all the support divers.
With extreme deep diving the crystal fails first. Which is why domed is better. Example the extreme watches from Rolex which a company to both the Trieste and James Cameron.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,538 Posts
It looks huge, did you scrape knuckles on the ground. How did it were...
It wore ridiculous. Very cool but very impractical. Surprisingly it didn't feel that heavy though (but I'm used to big watches). The bracelet and clasp balance it well. Wears very high though obviously. If the Tuna is the Tuna Can, this thing is the Can O' Soup. Ithink you'd hit the windowsill in the car with every left turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,600 Posts
I currently have in my possession three watches that have helium valves. The only time I'm around helium is at birthday parties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
548 Posts
Seiko has secret group of divers that go to much greater depths to test their watches. It all very underground and they don't want the general public to know much about it. This is how they do their research and this is why they keep coming out with watches that have HUGE depth ratings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
I would toss the watch in water form the boat to see how it does in the deep...I am not going to look at those weird crtitters ,,except on tv
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I have been watching vodeo of Comex's Hydra 8. The diver in the bell is wearing a watch. I was wondering what it was due to the fact the divers were on hydrogen. The hole habitat was surrounded by nitrogen on the ship to reduce the risk of explosion. Comex has had a long history with Rolex. I never got to see a shot of the watch. This experiment with depth was long before watches could stand the pressure. The divers could have nothing with them that could spark. So what watch was the support diver wearing in the bell?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Depth limit for recreational divers, 12 metres, depth limit for experienced divers, 18 metres, depth at which nitrogen bubbles develop in your blood, 30 metres, scuba diving world record 324 metres, depth my £14.99 watch will operate to, 500 metres, cheers casio thats a relief,
a little light hearted read there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Love Casio. The previous deep open circuit scuba record, a Frogman was used. 1044 feet. Exlay used a $24 Casio to 800 feet. There tuff as nails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
Love Casio. The previous deep open circuit scuba record, a Frogman was used. 1044 feet. Exlay used a $24 Casio to 800 feet. There tuff as nails.
Well since the frogman is a 200m ISO divers watch - I'd be mightily unimpressed if it didn't work at 1044ft - as it's tested to 250m as part of it's certification.
And surely the price is totally irrelevant - as he could buy a battered SKX007 for peanuts and claim the same thing! What was the actual watch model that was used??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Depth limit for recreational divers, 12 metres, depth limit for experienced divers, 18 metres, depth at which nitrogen bubbles develop in your blood, 30 metres, scuba diving world record 324 metres, depth my £14.99 watch will operate to, 500 metres, cheers casio thats a relief,
a little light hearted read there.
On my open water certification, my instructor took me down to 21 meters, and we also went caving!

But yeah, I never want to go past 40 meters. Water gets really cold, and visibility drops. In short, it would be a very boring experience for a recreational diver.

Because pressure increases by twice at 10 meters, 3x at 20 meters and 4x at 30 meters, you're also looking at a very short dive as you're using that much more air. All around, not fun.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top