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Discussion Starter #1
Cheers!

I have just had the most bizarre experience when my local watchmaker presented my beloved Seiko 6105 after a standard pressure testing.
IT WAS IN PIECES!
Chrystal, glass, Bezel and insert, dial and hands were just loose.



Anyone who would like to share any thoughts on why and what might have gone wrong?

My best guess is that the watch wasn't proof and when it was depressurised the way out for the trapped air was closed. At a certain point the pressure difference got too high and the watch exploded...

But jeeez...
 

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Looks as if the pressure was somehow applied internally, I know that's ludicrous but it's strange what happened to the watch. Can you give more details?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Looks as if the pressure was somehow applied internally, I know that's ludicrous but it's strange what happened to the watch. Can you give more details?
Well, it was disassembled and just overhauled. All gaskets looked ok, so they were just greased up a bit.
Crown worked fine, but the locking pin had been bent, so it was restored, and the crown "locked" pretty good.

I'm surprised that the pressure tester didn't warn for internal overpressure before depressurising...

Now the test was made by a third party, and they don't want any responsibility for this mess. I think that's pretty lame. Surely they must have some guilt in this also.
 

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failed seal.

The watch soaks up air in the heightened pressure space. This happens slowly. Then the watch maker quickly releases the pressure. Bang.....
 

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Well, it was disassembled and just overhauled. All gaskets looked ok, so they were just greased up a bit.
Crown worked fine, but the locking pin had been bent, so it was restored, and the crown "locked" pretty good.

I'm surprised that the pressure tester didn't warn for internal overpressure before depressurising...

Now the test was made by a third party, and they don't want any responsibility for this mess. I think that's pretty lame. Surely they must have some guilt in this also.
They should at least explain the procedure to the customer and the risks involved. I'm sorry that this happened to you.
 

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i only test vintage watches to 2 or 3 bar.

It may say 150m on the dial. How far will a recreational diver go. I dive and 35m is basically my max depth.
Most divers watch owners use them in the bath or swimming pool
I used a depth guage in my tester and at full crank it measures 68metres depth pressure.
I think anything with a screw down crystal like a tuna or a MM 300 should be ok tested at 6 bar. Anything else be warned!!!
 

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testing proceedure

John. Do you let the watch soak up the 6 bar pressure for a few minutes then drop in the water and then release the pressure to watch for escaping bubbles?

I always release the pressure as slow as poss above the water then and only then if all is ok i dunk the watch to look for bubbles.
I have had a watch blow like the OP mentions. At least if it blows above the water you have a better chance of saving the watch.
Some watch makers only test the bare case without a movement for that reason.
 

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Hi John, I pump it up to pressure, leave for 10/15mins and release without dunking, then I pump it up again and let it stand for 10/15 mins then I dunk it and release the pressure slowly while submerged.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hi John, I pump it up to pressure, leave for 10/15mins and release without dunking, then I pump it up again and let it stand for 10/15 mins then I dunk it and release the pressure slowly while submerged.
Ooops! :eek:hmy:

The pressure tester in this case was based on only air and a micrometer glass lift measurement. For overpressure in the watch will make the glass lift a bit...and this is recorded.
 

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My watchmaker always takes the movement out prior to pt and testing an empty case.. Now I understand the reason..
 
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